RebKell's Junkie Boards
Board Junkies Forums
 
Log in Register FAQ Memberlist Search RebKell's Junkie Boards Forum Index

Question(s) about Adia Barnes & Race
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    RebKell's Junkie Boards Forum Index » NCAA Women's Basketball - General Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
summertime blues



Joined: 16 Apr 2013
Posts: 6379
Location: Shenandoah Valley


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/02/21 10:15 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

PG4ever wrote:
summertime blues wrote:
ClayK wrote:
It's such a fine line (as an old white male).

So let's say there's a group of players coaches are talking about. (And this is a legit question.)

Is it OK to say "The Black girl looks good"? I feel like I shouldn't say that, shouldn't use "Black." I feel like I need to say "The girl is red shorts looks good."

In other settings, when you're trying to identify a person in a group (not in a negative way, just to determine who's being discussed), is it OK to say "Oh, the Black guy"? Or again, "The guy in the blue shorts"?


OK, here's an example from one of my granddaughters (I have 11 grandkids, all but one of whom are multi-ethnic of some kind). This girl's mother is Black (with some white, obviously, because she and her family are pretty light) and her dad is Puerto Rican. When she was applying for college monies, she said to me, "For some, I can play the Black card, for some I play the Hispanic card. Honestly, I'd rather just play the honor student card."


It doesn't have to be either/or. She can be the Black Hispanic honor student and be eligible for scholarships that target African American students, those that target Hispanic students and those that target honor students. That language of "playing the race card" makes it sound like students of color are getting some kind of unearned advantage over white students and when you look at the data (number of students of color on college campuses, scholarship money, etc.) that's not the case.


Actually not. Her point was that there are certain scholarships that are for Black students. others that ate for Hispanic students, etc. She said that to me in a moment of frustration.



_________________
Don't take life so serious. It ain't nohows permanent.
It takes 3 years to build a team and 7 to build a program.--Conventional Wisdom
PG4ever



Joined: 14 May 2020
Posts: 97



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/02/21 10:15 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Howee wrote:
myrtle wrote:
In general I'm a terrible 'describer'.* Sometimes my blind housemate will ask me what someone looks like. I say something like "she's got a great smile" "she has long hair pulled back in a pony tail" If it's a basketball player, I will usually talk about her playing style.....


I might beg to differ with you: living with a blind person may qualify you to be among The Best of 'describers'. Really. Think about it....it is only us *sighted* folks who make those racial distinctions from afar. (I may be mistaken; I know no blind people closely....can they determine racial distinctions if in a group?) But serving as the *eyes* for a blind person most likely enables you to have honed your skills in assessing what is most important in 'seeing' another person.

Re: the original post, I certainly understand the pride and even the need for Dawn to point out this milestone. Being of the age I am, I must also add that it's a tiny bit bittersweet that CVS never got that NC -- she certainly paid her dues to that end.

I can only hope I live long enough to be in that time and space where it is all moot and passe. Cool

(*except when you call me 'flippant'! Razz Laughing )


When I'm dealing with in-laws, nieces, nephews, and cousins their race is just not something I think about unless they run into some race related situation and tell me about it. I don't know if this answers your question or not, but thanks for asking. It at least made me think about it some more.

This is why race/ethnicity is so salient to those of us who are African American. From birth, we are always running into some race related situation--or more accurately, they're always running into us.


PG4ever



Joined: 14 May 2020
Posts: 97



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/02/21 10:45 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

bcdawg04 wrote:
PG4ever wrote:
myrtle wrote:
I too was surprised to hear Adia mentioned as black. But sometimes it's true that I just don't really notice so I assumed I hadn't really looked. When someone asks me to describe another person, ethnicity is just usually not at the top of my 'notice' list.


I want to push you to think about your statement a little more. If you didn't notice then why would you be surprised to hear that she was black? I would say you did notice and your brain assumed she was white and that's why you were surprised to hear that she was black. That's not an attack. I just think it's important for people who are not black to think more critically about how they think about race/ethnicity and to learn more about how black folks think about it. I have a question for you and I genuinely want to hear your answer if you're up to answering it. Why do you think ethnicity is not at the top of your list when you're describing someone? As a black woman, my African American identity is very core to who I am. If someone were describing me and didn't mention that I was AA I would think they don't see me, that I'm kind of invisible to them and that, in not noticing, they disregard the history of African Americans in this country. I appreciate your thoughts and willingness to have dialogue.


I have an honest question, if I may. If someone describes you to me as "an African American person," what is it you hope that I infer about you from that description?

Or, would you expect that identifying you as "an African American person" is only part of how s/he describes you?


Only speaking for myself, when someone describes me as AA, it's not so much what you/they infer about me but how I feel (seen) and what I infer about you/them (that you/they truly see me). I don't have negative feelings toward someone who uses the color blind approach but in terms of describing myself, it's just not my preference. African American is certainly not the only way that I would like someone to describe me but my AA identity is a core part of who I am.


myrtle



Joined: 02 May 2008
Posts: 28909



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/02/21 3:00 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

PG4ever wrote:


When I'm dealing with in-laws, nieces, nephews, and cousins their race is just not something I think about unless they run into some race related situation and tell me about it. I don't know if this answers your question or not, but thanks for asking. It at least made me think about it some more.

This is why race/ethnicity is so salient to those of us who are African American. From birth, we are always running into some race related situation--or more accurately, they're always running into us.


yes I do understand that. My heart aches for those affected by racism. I saw it first hand as a college student when I dated a man of color. We were stopped by the police for no good reason. The cop approached with gun drawn and sprawled my friend over the hood of the car, patted him down, and left him there while he came back to talk to me. His first question was "do you feel safe in the car with this man?" I was tongue-tied - like wtf is he asking me. There were many other aspects I won't even go in to. Ok, one thing he said was "you know most of that type end up in jail". [ the guy was a college athlete and both his parents were professionals ] But finally the cop walked back to his car and I heard him say under his breath "perverts". No tickets given. No explanation for the stop. Then he followed on our bumper and spotlighted us for the next five miles or so. And I know this is lightweight compared to many experiences, but it was really eye-opening for a dumb white girl from poodunk.


bcdawg04



Joined: 12 Apr 2016
Posts: 447
Location: Seattle


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/02/21 3:13 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

PG4ever wrote:
bcdawg04 wrote:
PG4ever wrote:
myrtle wrote:
I too was surprised to hear Adia mentioned as black. But sometimes it's true that I just don't really notice so I assumed I hadn't really looked. When someone asks me to describe another person, ethnicity is just usually not at the top of my 'notice' list.


I want to push you to think about your statement a little more. If you didn't notice then why would you be surprised to hear that she was black? I would say you did notice and your brain assumed she was white and that's why you were surprised to hear that she was black. That's not an attack. I just think it's important for people who are not black to think more critically about how they think about race/ethnicity and to learn more about how black folks think about it. I have a question for you and I genuinely want to hear your answer if you're up to answering it. Why do you think ethnicity is not at the top of your list when you're describing someone? As a black woman, my African American identity is very core to who I am. If someone were describing me and didn't mention that I was AA I would think they don't see me, that I'm kind of invisible to them and that, in not noticing, they disregard the history of African Americans in this country. I appreciate your thoughts and willingness to have dialogue.


I have an honest question, if I may. If someone describes you to me as "an African American person," what is it you hope that I infer about you from that description?

Or, would you expect that identifying you as "an African American person" is only part of how s/he describes you?


Only speaking for myself, when someone describes me as AA, it's not so much what you/they infer about me but how I feel (seen) and what I infer about you/them (that you/they truly see me). I don't have negative feelings toward someone who uses the color blind approach but in terms of describing myself, it's just not my preference. African American is certainly not the only way that I would like someone to describe me but my AA identity is a core part of who I am.


Thank you, I believe I understand what you are saying. As much as I would prefer not identifying myself here so that I can be judged solely based on what I post, I will say that as a person of color I hear you about wanting to be seen. I appreciate hearing some of your perspective on race and ethnicity.


PG4ever



Joined: 14 May 2020
Posts: 97



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/02/21 3:15 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

myrtle wrote:
PG4ever wrote:


When I'm dealing with in-laws, nieces, nephews, and cousins their race is just not something I think about unless they run into some race related situation and tell me about it. I don't know if this answers your question or not, but thanks for asking. It at least made me think about it some more.

This is why race/ethnicity is so salient to those of us who are African American. From birth, we are always running into some race related situation--or more accurately, they're always running into us.


yes I do understand that. My heart aches for those affected by racism. I saw it first hand as a college student when I dated a man of color. We were stopped by the police for no good reason. The cop approached with gun drawn and sprawled my friend over the hood of the car, patted him down, and left him there while he came back to talk to me. His first question was "do you feel safe in the car with this man?" I was tongue-tied - like wtf is he asking me. There were many other aspects I won't even go in to. Ok, one thing he said was "you know most of that type end up in jail". [ the guy was a college athlete and both his parents were professionals ] But finally the cop walked back to his car and I heard him say under his breath "perverts". No tickets given. No explanation for the stop. Then he followed on our bumper and spotlighted us for the next five miles or so. And I know this is lightweight compared to many experiences, but it was really eye-opening for a dumb white girl from poodunk.


I'm sorry that you had that experience. Unfortunately it was common and still happens. Let's hope that everybody's doing their part--individually and collectively, socially and politically, spiritually and humanistically--so that experiences like that become a thing of the past.


bcdawg04



Joined: 12 Apr 2016
Posts: 447
Location: Seattle


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/02/21 3:41 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

For those that did not know that Coach Barnes is Black until she reached the Final Four...to be honest, I did not know either. During her time at UW, I never read about her being described as or identifying herself as Black or African American. It never came up at any UW event. That's not to say that it never happened, but her being Black just wasn't common knowledge amongst fans.

That being said, I love seeing the history being made by Coach Barnes and Coach Staley and it being highlighted.

The other day, I watched this video of a roundtable discussion of several people of color in the entertainment industry. Even though they were speaking to some of their experiences in the entertainment industry, it is all relevant to basically any industry. They talked about how white people aren't just going to make room for minorities. People of color have to make their own room, take up space, and then succeed - when a white man is mediocre, he still has an abundance of opportunities.

Watching Coach Barnes and Coach Staley succeed despite the historically limited opportunities for people of color is tremendous. I hope it leads to increased opportunities for underrepresented minorities.


Howee



Joined: 27 Nov 2009
Posts: 13623
Location: OREGON (in my heart)


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/02/21 11:30 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

bcdawg04 wrote:
For those that did not know that Coach Barnes is Black until she reached the Final Four...to be honest, I did not know either.


The same for me....did not know, nor really cared. IFF her 'black identity' helps anyone, so be it. (I'm curious....has Adia herself ever spoken on the topic?) I'd think her own wishes should be at the forefront of HER experience..



_________________
Oregon: Go Ducks!
"Inévitablement, les canards voleront"
undersized_post



Joined: 01 Mar 2021
Posts: 970
Location: midwest/indiana/iowa


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/02/21 11:32 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Howee wrote:
bcdawg04 wrote:
For those that did not know that Coach Barnes is Black until she reached the Final Four...to be honest, I did not know either.


The same for me....did not know, nor really cared. IFF her 'black identity' helps anyone, so be it. (I'm curious....has Adia herself ever spoken on the topic?) I'd think her own wishes should be at the forefront of HER experience..


She just talked about it in the postgame press conference!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msGoNOmtoSM


PG4ever



Joined: 14 May 2020
Posts: 97



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/03/21 8:23 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

undersized_post wrote:
Howee wrote:
bcdawg04 wrote:
For those that did not know that Coach Barnes is Black until she reached the Final Four...to be honest, I did not know either.


The same for me....did not know, nor really cared. IFF her 'black identity' helps anyone, so be it. (I'm curious....has Adia herself ever spoken on the topic?) I'd think her own wishes should be at the forefront of HER experience..


She just talked about it in the postgame press conference!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msGoNOmtoSM


Coach Adia Barnes in the presser: “Representation matters. Opportunities matter. ...We’re not only recruiters. ...Don’t allow yourself--as a female, as a black female--to be pigeonholed into one thing. ...Given opportunities we can definitely flourish.”

She also commented on the fact that she knows as a black female coach, she has to succeed because black women coaches don't get recycled/don’t get second opportunities the way white coaches. As Barnes said, it’s unfortunate and hopefully that will change too.


ClayK



Joined: 11 Oct 2005
Posts: 10975



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/03/21 11:52 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I would love to have someone answer this ...

It's such a fine line (as an old white male).

So let's say there's a group of players coaches are talking about. (And this is a legit question.)

Is it OK to say "The Black girl looks good"? I feel like I shouldn't say that, shouldn't use "Black." I feel like I need to say "The girl is red shorts looks good."

In other settings, when you're trying to identify a person in a group (not in a negative way, just to determine who's being discussed), is it OK to say "Oh, the Black guy"? Or again, "The guy in the blue shorts"?



_________________
Oṃ Tāre Tuttāre Ture Svāhā
PG4ever



Joined: 14 May 2020
Posts: 97



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/03/21 3:05 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Nice video profile of Barnes and her working relationship with her husband Salvo Coppa who is one of her assistants. From 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKRx-pVcSsc


taropatch



Joined: 24 Feb 2009
Posts: 784
Location: Kau Rubbish Dump


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/03/21 3:53 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
I would love to have someone answer this ...

It's such a fine line (as an old white male).

So let's say there's a group of players coaches are talking about. (And this is a legit question.)

Is it OK to say "The Black girl looks good"? I feel like I shouldn't say that, shouldn't use "Black." I feel like I need to say "The girl is red shorts looks good."

In other settings, when you're trying to identify a person in a group (not in a negative way, just to determine who's being discussed), is it OK to say "Oh, the Black guy"? Or again, "The guy in the blue shorts"?


It depends on the situation.

Let’s say you are discussing players with three other coaches (any/various skin colors) that you know very well and am familiar with each other’s reactions. “I like that black girl” is ok.

Similar situation where at least one of the coaches you don’t know very well. “I like that kid in the red shorts” is safer.

If you get a response, “Which one?” then you will have to take it from there. Very Happy



_________________
I'm looking out the window, and the trucks won't stop coming (thank you, Sadie)
Howee



Joined: 27 Nov 2009
Posts: 13623
Location: OREGON (in my heart)


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/03/21 3:53 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
I would love to have someone answer this ...

It's such a fine line (as an old white male).

So let's say there's a group of players coaches are talking about. (And this is a legit question.)

Is it OK to say "The Black girl looks good"? I feel like I shouldn't say that, shouldn't use "Black." I feel like I need to say "The girl is red shorts looks good."

In other settings, when you're trying to identify a person in a group (not in a negative way, just to determine who's being discussed), is it OK to say "Oh, the Black guy"? Or again, "The guy in the blue shorts"?


As (another) old white male, I'd say it depends on who's playing. I mean, if it's 1 white kid in a bunch of black kids, and s/he's excelling, AND you don't know names or see numbers, I'd find no offense to saying, "That white kid has some terrific handles!". Reverse it, and it's still good by me. Just my 2 cents....keep the change. Cool



_________________
Oregon: Go Ducks!
"Inévitablement, les canards voleront"
summertime blues



Joined: 16 Apr 2013
Posts: 6379
Location: Shenandoah Valley


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/03/21 5:55 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Howee wrote:
ClayK wrote:
I would love to have someone answer this ...

It's such a fine line (as an old white male).

So let's say there's a group of players coaches are talking about. (And this is a legit question.)

Is it OK to say "The Black girl looks good"? I feel like I shouldn't say that, shouldn't use "Black." I feel like I need to say "The girl is red shorts looks good."

In other settings, when you're trying to identify a person in a group (not in a negative way, just to determine who's being discussed), is it OK to say "Oh, the Black guy"? Or again, "The guy in the blue shorts"?


As (another) old white male, I'd say it depends on who's playing. I mean, if it's 1 white kid in a bunch of black kids, and s/he's excelling, AND you don't know names or see numbers, I'd find no offense to saying, "That white kid has some terrific handles!". Reverse it, and it's still good by me. Just my 2 cents....keep the change. Cool


They are gonna have some difficulty with my youngest granddaughter...a brown-eyed blonde of Black, Native American (Muscokee Creek) and white heritage. She's only dark in the summertime. Her birth certificate lists her as Black because of the archaic rule that "you are what your mother is" and her mother describes herself as "the whiteest Black person you ever saw" (she could "pass" but sees no reason to). I have a feeling that P may choose to identify as Native American...no particular reason except that she is such a daddy's girl, besides which she qualifies to be an enrolled tribal member.



_________________
Don't take life so serious. It ain't nohows permanent.
It takes 3 years to build a team and 7 to build a program.--Conventional Wisdom
NoDakSt



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 4601
Location: Attilan


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/03/21 6:04 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

osubeavers wrote:
Here’s a touching story about Adia and her father.

https://tucson.com/sports/arizonawildcats/basketball/arizona-coach-adia-barnes-finally-got-to-know-her-father-then-she-lost-him/article_9dd8efd3-0b00-5026-a1dd-26b558d40300.html


Great story. Love A’dia.



_________________
Free your mind and your ass will follow.
auntie



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 1771
Location: Brooklyn, NY


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/04/21 10:22 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Thank you all for a very interesting discussion. I have two questions:

1. Is it ok to describe someone as blond or Asian? I know that the prejudice toward other groups is by no means at the same level as toward African Americans, but there are stereotypes.

2. Is our aim a color blind society? If so, what is wrong for not noticing that someone is Black?



_________________
A woman's place is in the paint--Another artist for Liberty.
Howee



Joined: 27 Nov 2009
Posts: 13623
Location: OREGON (in my heart)


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/04/21 1:21 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

NoDakSt wrote:
osubeavers wrote:
Here’s a touching story about Adia and her father.

https://tucson.com/sports/arizonawildcats/basketball/arizona-coach-adia-barnes-finally-got-to-know-her-father-then-she-lost-him/article_9dd8efd3-0b00-5026-a1dd-26b558d40300.html


Great story. Love A’dia.


Amazing lady. I never knew any of that. Thank you for sharing it.

auntie wrote:
Thank you all for a very interesting discussion. I have two questions:

1. Is it ok to describe someone as blond or Asian? I know that the prejudice toward other groups is by no means at the same level as toward African Americans, but there are stereotypes.

2. Is our aim a color blind society? If so, what is wrong for not noticing that someone is Black?


Re: #1, I'd think it's okay -- but again, all in context. If there's only one Asian in the group, why not? If there's several Asians, then....? (by the way, I have Asian friends who'd be very torqued if someone referred to them as Chinese, if they're Korean, or as Japanese if they're Thai, etc. -- Shocked ) Blond? Why not? These days kids color their hair green, blue, whatever, so there's another convenient descriptor.



_________________
Oregon: Go Ducks!
"Inévitablement, les canards voleront"
PlayBally'all



Joined: 17 Oct 2013
Posts: 271



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/08/21 1:59 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I thought about this thread when I read this story today.

https://sports.yahoo.com/1st-black-unc-head-coach-152901216.html


NoDakSt



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 4601
Location: Attilan


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/08/21 7:00 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

NM



_________________
Free your mind and your ass will follow.
PG4ever



Joined: 14 May 2020
Posts: 97



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/08/21 9:42 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

summertime blues wrote:
Howee wrote:
ClayK wrote:
I would love to have someone answer this ...

It's such a fine line (as an old white male).

So let's say there's a group of players coaches are talking about. (And this is a legit question.)

Is it OK to say "The Black girl looks good"? I feel like I shouldn't say that, shouldn't use "Black." I feel like I need to say "The girl is red shorts looks good."

In other settings, when you're trying to identify a person in a group (not in a negative way, just to determine who's being discussed), is it OK to say "Oh, the Black guy"? Or again, "The guy in the blue shorts"?


As (another) old white male, I'd say it depends on who's playing. I mean, if it's 1 white kid in a bunch of black kids, and s/he's excelling, AND you don't know names or see numbers, I'd find no offense to saying, "That white kid has some terrific handles!". Reverse it, and it's still good by me. Just my 2 cents....keep the change. Cool


They are gonna have some difficulty with my youngest granddaughter...a brown-eyed blonde of Black, Native American (Muscokee Creek) and white heritage. She's only dark in the summertime. Her birth certificate lists her as Black because of the archaic rule that "you are what your mother is" and her mother describes herself as "the whiteest Black person you ever saw" (she could "pass" but sees no reason to). I have a feeling that P may choose to identify as Native American...no particular reason except that she is such a daddy's girl, besides which she qualifies to be an enrolled tribal member.


Her birth certificate lists her as Black because of the archaic rule that "you are what your mother is"

That's interesting. I'm aware of the "you are what your mother is" sentiment socially/culturally but in terms of birth certificates I'm not aware of any such rule. My understanding was that parents selected race/ethnicity on birth certificates.


PlayBally'all



Joined: 17 Oct 2013
Posts: 271



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/09/21 12:27 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

PG4ever wrote:
summertime blues wrote:
Howee wrote:
ClayK wrote:
I would love to have someone answer this ...

It's such a fine line (as an old white male).

So let's say there's a group of players coaches are talking about. (And this is a legit question.)

Is it OK to say "The Black girl looks good"? I feel like I shouldn't say that, shouldn't use "Black." I feel like I need to say "The girl is red shorts looks good."

In other settings, when you're trying to identify a person in a group (not in a negative way, just to determine who's being discussed), is it OK to say "Oh, the Black guy"? Or again, "The guy in the blue shorts"?


As (another) old white male, I'd say it depends on who's playing. I mean, if it's 1 white kid in a bunch of black kids, and s/he's excelling, AND you don't know names or see numbers, I'd find no offense to saying, "That white kid has some terrific handles!". Reverse it, and it's still good by me. Just my 2 cents....keep the change. Cool


They are gonna have some difficulty with my youngest granddaughter...a brown-eyed blonde of Black, Native American (Muscokee Creek) and white heritage. She's only dark in the summertime. Her birth certificate lists her as Black because of the archaic rule that "you are what your mother is" and her mother describes herself as "the whiteest Black person you ever saw" (she could "pass" but sees no reason to). I have a feeling that P may choose to identify as Native American...no particular reason except that she is such a daddy's girl, besides which she qualifies to be an enrolled tribal member.


Her birth certificate lists her as Black because of the archaic rule that "you are what your mother is"

That's interesting. I'm aware of the "you are what your mother is" sentiment socially/culturally but in terms of birth certificates I'm not aware of any such rule. My understanding was that parents selected race/ethnicity on birth certificates.


I believe that it depends on the state.


tfan



Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 8487



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/09/21 2:40 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:

Is it OK to say "The Black girl looks good"? I feel like I shouldn't say that, shouldn't use "Black." I feel like I need to say "The girl is red shorts looks good."


This is going back decades, but I have seen boxing fights called where one fighter is black and the other is white. And they both have on the same color shorts/trunks. Throughout the fight if the announcer wanted to clarify who is who he would say "Jones, in the white trunks with the red trim" and "Johnson, in the white trunks with the blue trim". And in both cases there was a large black band around the waistline, and thin hard to see trim around the rest of the shorts.


summertime blues



Joined: 16 Apr 2013
Posts: 6379
Location: Shenandoah Valley


Back to top
PostPosted: 04/09/21 2:42 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

PlayBally'all wrote:
PG4ever wrote:
summertime blues wrote:
Howee wrote:
ClayK wrote:
I would love to have someone answer this ...

It's such a fine line (as an old white male).

So let's say there's a group of players coaches are talking about. (And this is a legit question.)

Is it OK to say "The Black girl looks good"? I feel like I shouldn't say that, shouldn't use "Black." I feel like I need to say "The girl is red shorts looks good."

In other settings, when you're trying to identify a person in a group (not in a negative way, just to determine who's being discussed), is it OK to say "Oh, the Black guy"? Or again, "The guy in the blue shorts"?


As (another) old white male, I'd say it depends on who's playing. I mean, if it's 1 white kid in a bunch of black kids, and s/he's excelling, AND you don't know names or see numbers, I'd find no offense to saying, "That white kid has some terrific handles!". Reverse it, and it's still good by me. Just my 2 cents....keep the change. Cool


They are gonna have some difficulty with my youngest granddaughter...a brown-eyed blonde of Black, Native American (Muscokee Creek) and white heritage. She's only dark in the summertime. Her birth certificate lists her as Black because of the archaic rule that "you are what your mother is" and her mother describes herself as "the whiteest Black person you ever saw" (she could "pass" but sees no reason to). I have a feeling that P may choose to identify as Native American...no particular reason except that she is such a daddy's girl, besides which she qualifies to be an enrolled tribal member.


Her birth certificate lists her as Black because of the archaic rule that "you are what your mother is"

That's interesting. I'm aware of the "you are what your mother is" sentiment socially/culturally but in terms of birth certificates I'm not aware of any such rule. My understanding was that parents selected race/ethnicity on birth certificates.


I believe that it depends on the state.


It is true through much of the south. P was born in Florida. My grandson, who you would absolutely 100% identify as Black, and who says he is Black, and is listed as white on his birth certificate because his mother is, was born in Tennessee. And I know this is true is Tennessee because I worked neonatal for a good little while and have friends who still do. As one of those friends used to say, "It's because it's obvious who your mom is....but they never really knew who your dad was, at least until DNA."



_________________
Don't take life so serious. It ain't nohows permanent.
It takes 3 years to build a team and 7 to build a program.--Conventional Wisdom
PlayBally'all



Joined: 17 Oct 2013
Posts: 271



Back to top
PostPosted: 04/09/21 4:47 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

summertime blues wrote:
PlayBally'all wrote:
PG4ever wrote:
summertime blues wrote:
Howee wrote:
ClayK wrote:
I would love to have someone answer this ...

It's such a fine line (as an old white male).

So let's say there's a group of players coaches are talking about. (And this is a legit question.)

Is it OK to say "The Black girl looks good"? I feel like I shouldn't say that, shouldn't use "Black." I feel like I need to say "The girl is red shorts looks good."

In other settings, when you're trying to identify a person in a group (not in a negative way, just to determine who's being discussed), is it OK to say "Oh, the Black guy"? Or again, "The guy in the blue shorts"?


As (another) old white male, I'd say it depends on who's playing. I mean, if it's 1 white kid in a bunch of black kids, and s/he's excelling, AND you don't know names or see numbers, I'd find no offense to saying, "That white kid has some terrific handles!". Reverse it, and it's still good by me. Just my 2 cents....keep the change. Cool


They are gonna have some difficulty with my youngest granddaughter...a brown-eyed blonde of Black, Native American (Muscokee Creek) and white heritage. She's only dark in the summertime. Her birth certificate lists her as Black because of the archaic rule that "you are what your mother is" and her mother describes herself as "the whiteest Black person you ever saw" (she could "pass" but sees no reason to). I have a feeling that P may choose to identify as Native American...no particular reason except that she is such a daddy's girl, besides which she qualifies to be an enrolled tribal member.


Her birth certificate lists her as Black because of the archaic rule that "you are what your mother is"

That's interesting. I'm aware of the "you are what your mother is" sentiment socially/culturally but in terms of birth certificates I'm not aware of any such rule. My understanding was that parents selected race/ethnicity on birth certificates.


I believe that it depends on the state.


It is true through much of the south. P was born in Florida. My grandson, who you would absolutely 100% identify as Black, and who says he is Black, and is listed as white on his birth certificate because his mother is, was born in Tennessee. And I know this is true is Tennessee because I worked neonatal for a good little while and have friends who still do. As one of those friends used to say, "It's because it's obvious who your mom is....but they never really knew who your dad was, at least until DNA."


Good point


Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    RebKell's Junkie Boards Forum Index » NCAA Women's Basketball - General Discussion All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB 2.0.17 © 2001- 2004 phpBB Group
phpBB Template by Vjacheslav Trushkin