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2020 - 2021 University class plans (in person/online)
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tfan



Joined: 31 May 2010
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PostPosted: 04/25/20 10:29 pm    ::: 2020 - 2021 University class plans (in person/online) Reply Reply with quote

Nebraska went online for the rest of the spring and summer, but is planning on holding in-person classes in the fall.

https://www.nhregister.com/news/article/U-of-Nebraska-plans-to-hold-in-person-classes-in-15224956.php

San Jose State thinks majority online-only is the most likely scenario.

https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/san-jose-state-plans-for-mostly-online-classes-in-fall/2278143/


ClayK



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PostPosted: 04/26/20 12:55 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I'm guessing a combination will be the most common solution.

Large survey classes can be done on-line, as can, say, English or history. But lab courses, for example, need students there doing the work.

My wife is teaching on-line right now (fifth grade) and though she does make progress, it's much different, much harder and probably not as effective.



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ArtBest23



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PostPosted: 04/26/20 1:43 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Some of the big football factories won't notice any difference. This sounds like it could have been written yesterday about social distancing, but it actually is from an article last September, pre-pandemic:

Quote:
Justin Fields takes online classes, doesn’t spend much time on the Ohio State University campus and uses his free time away from his online classes to watch Netflix or at the football offices going through workouts and training. That’s what we learned Tuesday about the quarterback of the No. 5 team in the country. If you have a soft spot for the days at the blue blood schools when college quarterbacks walked to class with leaves crunching under their feet, this isn’t a great time to be alive for you.


https://bustedcoverage.com/2019/09/25/justin-fields-takes-online-classes-not-on-ohio-state-campus-much/


UK1996



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PostPosted: 04/27/20 12:52 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I work for a small DI university, and our administration's current plan is to have classes in the Fall as long as our governor allows it. A lot of universities in our state are struggling with the Spring closures.



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CalwbbFan



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PostPosted: 04/27/20 4:15 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I think this piece in the NY Times provides a pretty good overview of what might await. I think smaller colleges with smaller class sizes will be able to continue to have students, but with social distancing in mind....Testing will also be key. Worth reading....I truly hope that higher education can survive this..

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/26/opinion/coronavirus-colleges-universities.html
Quote:
The reopening of college and university campuses in the fall should be a national priority. Institutions should develop public health plans now that build on three basic elements of controlling the spread of infection: test, trace and separate.

These plans must be based on the reality that there will be upticks or resurgences in infection until a vaccine is developed, even after we succeed in flattening the curve. We can’t simply send students home and shift to remote learning every time this happens. Colleges and universities must be able to safely handle the possibility of infection on campus while maintaining the continuity of their core academic functions.


FrozenLVFan



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PostPosted: 04/27/20 5:01 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

CalwbbFan wrote:
I think this piece in the NY Times provides a pretty good overview of what might await. I think smaller colleges with smaller class sizes will be able to continue to have students, but with social distancing in mind....Testing will also be key. Worth reading....I truly hope that higher education can survive this..

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/26/opinion/coronavirus-colleges-universities.html
Quote:
The reopening of college and university campuses in the fall should be a national priority. Institutions should develop public health plans now that build on three basic elements of controlling the spread of infection: test, trace and separate.

These plans must be based on the reality that there will be upticks or resurgences in infection until a vaccine is developed, even after we succeed in flattening the curve. We can’t simply send students home and shift to remote learning every time this happens. Colleges and universities must be able to safely handle the possibility of infection on campus while maintaining the continuity of their core academic functions.



I can see some big challenges here for institutions that have never had to manage this type of thing before. Estimates are all over the place, but it seems likely that at least 25% of people with the virus are asymptomatic, and that number may be a lot higher in the college-age population. It's going to be difficult to practice even relaxed measures of social distancing in dorms and other college housing, particularly with shared bathrooms, and that's assuming students are motivated to be compliant. And schools are going to have to protect all of their older faculty and staff as well.

Every time one person becomes clinically ill, you're going to have to test an awful lot of people. Given our country's disorganization in sourcing adequate testing kits, supplies, and personnel so far, I'm not even sure we can manage that by Sept.


ArtBest23



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PostPosted: 04/27/20 7:50 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

If the record of spring break, pre-departure, and other post-social-distancing-recommendation ignore-the-rules parties is any indication, the likelihood of college students NOT having parties and other alcohol-fueled crowded social events is approximately zero.

And I would expect that figuring out safe housing is a lot more difficult than safe classrooms. It's not like landlords are going to slash rental rates so that students don't have to squeeze into group houses off campus.

And if you're in a group house, any exposure by any of your roommates is in effect an exposure to you, whether you know about it or not, and there's not much you can really do to protect yourself.


FrozenLVFan



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PostPosted: 04/27/20 9:43 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ArtBest23 wrote:
If the record of spring break, pre-departure, and other post-social-distancing-recommendation ignore-the-rules parties is any indication, the likelihood of college students NOT having parties and other alcohol-fueled crowded social events is approximately zero.

And I would expect that figuring out safe housing is a lot more difficult than safe classrooms. It's not like landlords are going to slash rental rates so that students don't have to squeeze into group houses off campus.

And if you're in a group house, any exposure by any of your roommates is in effect an exposure to you, whether you know about it or not, and there's not much you can really do to protect yourself.


Exactly. I don’t see how contact tracing is remotely workable.


ClayK



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PostPosted: 04/28/20 8:59 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Here in Northern California, the only group consistently ignoring social distancing and group close contact are teenagers. You see soccer players and football players working out in groups, three or four young people hiking together without masks, etc.

It's just human nature, really, and to imagine that college students aren't going to be heavily involved in the mating game is a fantasy, plain and simple.

All that said, schools (including colleges) need to reopen in August in some manner, and will do so, I'm almost certain, regardless of the spike in cases and dangers to older adults on campuses.



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Howee



Joined: 27 Nov 2009
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PostPosted: 04/28/20 8:28 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
I'm guessing a combination will be the most common solution.

Large survey classes can be done on-line, as can, say, English or history. But lab courses, for example, need students there doing the work.

My wife is teaching on-line right now (fifth grade) and though she does make progress, it's much different, much harder and probably not as effective.


It's interesting to speak with friends about how their 'work from home' is, in some cases, going well, with little change in productivity, and others find it not so great. But I can vouch for the fact that education -- at the lower levels, at least -- is NOT enhanced so much by the 'stay at home' thing.

New paradigms, new lifestyle. Shocked



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tfan



Joined: 31 May 2010
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PostPosted: 04/29/20 6:37 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Stanford has not yet decided what to do. And they are going to have to follow the governor's rules, which are pointing towards allowing some modified version of in-person classes, but not allowing sporting event crowds and like. Would be good for students if they got rid of those classes that take place in giant packed auditoriums.

Quote:
Newsom expressed optimism that students could attend school in the fall, albeit with measures to foster social distance, but he warned that mass gatherings are unlikely until California develops herd immunity or a vaccine is created.


https://www.stanforddaily.com/2020/04/14/university-actively-discussing-fall-plans-governor-shares-conditions-needed-to-relax-social-distancing/




Last edited by tfan on 04/29/20 10:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
ArtBest23



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PostPosted: 04/29/20 12:32 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Personally I don't see how any of this works until there are one or more effective vaccines readily available and that's not even going to be close by Labor Day.

I understand people want everything to get back to "normal", to the way it used to be, but that's just not going to happen anytime soon.


elsie



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PostPosted: 04/29/20 9:50 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

"If you have a soft spot for the days at the blue blood schools when college quarterbacks walked to class with leaves crunching under their feet, this isn’t a great time to be alive for you."

that would be me....lol.....


elsie



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PostPosted: 04/29/20 10:00 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

"flattening the curve" was the original reason to lockdown the country....we're past that....well past it in many areas...hospitals are empty and paying nurses to stay home for the day....

so now they come up with another goal....increasing herd immunity....



if they wanted herd immunity, they should have told risky people to stay home and kept the schools open and society open...

several recent studies around the globe show that children do not get sick from covid,and they don't even pass it along....

the virus is here and it will be here....there will be other viruses.....


has lockdown stopped deaths?....I doubt it.....its hard to see that it did anything to protect the most vulnerable since our nursing homes have been struck hard...

sick frail elderly etc people should isolate....but the rest of the world has to go on...

we had better get sports back or many of us will be exploding....


ArtBest23



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PostPosted: 04/29/20 11:34 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

elsie wrote:


several recent studies around the globe show that children do not get sick from covid,and they don't even pass it along....



To the contrary, there have been illness and even death among children, and in the past few days medical experts ( including at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D.C. and the Paediatric Intensive Care Society in the U.K.)have warned that children with Covid in multiple countries are exhibiting a variety of symptoms resembling "Kawasaki disease" (mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome), a rare inflammatory syndrome.

Cleary children have been far less effected than seniors, and serious cases are uncommon, but it's not true that they uniformly "don't get sick."


FrozenLVFan



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PostPosted: 04/30/20 12:00 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Additionally, an as yet unpublished German study has just shown that the viral loads in infected children are the same as in adults, suggesting they are just as infectious.

https://t.co/85BSM2ildy?amp=1


purduefanatic



Joined: 10 Aug 2011
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PostPosted: 05/04/20 11:32 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

elsie wrote:
hospitals are empty and paying nurses to stay home for the day....


In my wife's case, they are sending nurses from other units to assist in other units, which I don't quite understand. The alternative is paying the nurses 70% pandemic salary vs 100% regular salary, so it would make sense for them to just cancel her outright, pay her 70% instead of 100%. I know she would be fine with that.

At any rate, they have now started allowing "elective" surgeries to resume (things such as joint replacements, not just cosmetic type of things) so maybe hospitals can start to get things going again. I know not all states/cities are opening that back up just yet, but it is slowly beginning in parts of the country.


tfan



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PostPosted: 05/06/20 12:04 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Will Your College Open This Fall?

Boston University - yes, pending public health approval
Brown University - yes, expecting to test all students. Sports may be in empty arenas
Cornell University - four committees studying and will report in June
Harvard University - yes with details still being worked out
Ohio State - decision made in June
Purdue - yes
University of Texas - decision made in June


summertime blues



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PostPosted: 05/06/20 11:35 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Tennessee will open all its campuses.
https://www.wbir.com/article/news/university-of-tennessee-plans-to-welcome-students-back-to-all-campuses-in-the-fall/51-83140361-ff99-4eba-b19f-801dd38453c5



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summertime blues



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PostPosted: 05/07/20 6:27 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

All SEC schools plan to be open this fall.
https://www.wate.com/news/sec-schools-expect-campuses-to-be-open-in-the-fall/
I suspect most or all P5 schools will be open by then. Probably the greatest share of public mid-majors also.



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snzuluz



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PostPosted: 05/07/20 10:53 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I am currently teaching on the college level and small class sizes are great, but what about the dorms? How do you social distance in a dorm, dorm room, or bathroom?

In the teaching setting: Are you going to take temps of every student who walks in your classroom? Can you assure students and those teaching those students that deep cleaning is going on EVERY night?

My classroom before we went to online learning had five tables in a room the size of a dorm room...I had 4 students per table and there would have been NO way to social distance during my courses...I was told when I asked back in February to move to a larger classroom so kids could have some self-space that there were no other classrooms available. My evening course had 18 desks and 15 students enrolled...again there was NO way for them to social distance.

Often, we think only of the students, but what about the teachers - professors- labs assistants etc...we have NO control over who is in our classes and what they are bringing to class with them...this is so true on the K-12 setting.

MANY educators have pre-existing conditions and you are forcing them to show up to teach when in actuality, they are also putting their lives on the line. Yes, teachers/professors do go through chemo and other medical treatments, and then show up to teach...I have taught with several of them.


ClayK



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PostPosted: 05/07/20 12:18 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

snzuluz wrote:
I am currently teaching on the college level and small class sizes are great, but what about the dorms? How do you social distance in a dorm, dorm room, or bathroom?

In the teaching setting: Are you going to take temps of every student who walks in your classroom? Can you assure students and those teaching those students that deep cleaning is going on EVERY night?

My classroom before we went to online learning had five tables in a room the size of a dorm room...I had 4 students per table and there would have been NO way to social distance during my courses...I was told when I asked back in February to move to a larger classroom so kids could have some self-space that there were no other classrooms available. My evening course had 18 desks and 15 students enrolled...again there was NO way for them to social distance.

Often, we think only of the students, but what about the teachers - professors- labs assistants etc...we have NO control over who is in our classes and what they are bringing to class with them...this is so true on the K-12 setting.

MANY educators have pre-existing conditions and you are forcing them to show up to teach when in actuality, they are also putting their lives on the line. Yes, teachers/professors do go through chemo and other medical treatments, and then show up to teach...I have taught with several of them.


I agree -- the biggest issue isn't the students but all the other workers who are older and therefore more at risk.

Not going to be a simple solution ...



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Howee



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PostPosted: 05/07/20 1:02 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

snzuluz wrote:
Often, we think only of the students, but what about the teachers - professors- labs assistants etc...we have NO control over who is in our classes and what they are bringing to class with them...this is so true on the K-12 setting.

MANY educators have pre-existing conditions and you are forcing them to show up to teach when in actuality, they are also putting their lives on the line. Yes, teachers/professors do go through chemo and other medical treatments, and then show up to teach...I have taught with several of them.


All uber-important considerations. I'm imagining that universities might consider giving at-risk personnel all kinds of PPE to keep themselves safe, at least, and perhaps afford students the same?



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tfan



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PostPosted: 05/13/20 12:23 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

The head of the 23 state universities in California just decided that all of them will continue with "most" classes in the fall as being online only


elsie



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PostPosted: 05/13/20 8:29 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

viruses are always with us....you can not escape them....almost all people who get it recover quickly.....its stunning how many of the victims are nursing home patients....last I looked, in Wash. State something like 90% of cases were people 60 and over and of that group the large majority was over 80.

you worried about teachers?...what about first line health care personal who get up front and personal with covid patients....

be realistic....

HIV was and is devastating....was there ever any call for "social distancing"?....ever?.....they wouldn't even close the bathhouses....and IIRC, Fauci was the head of the National Institute back then...

perspective.....you have to have perspective....

but, if one has concerns about their vulnerablity, like I do for example, then they should really keep on self isolating.....

also, Vit D and Vit C....


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