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GlennMacGrady



Joined: 03 Jan 2005
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PostPosted: 03/14/20 5:02 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

We can play semantic games about which disease is "more fatal", coronavirus or flu. No one really knows the death rate of either -- or what epidemiologists call the case fatality rate (CFR) -- since there's so little testing for either disease. However, the medical community has come to a sort of consensus that the CFR for the flu is 0.1%.

But, in our lay terminology, is SARS, with a CFR of 11%, more fatal than the flu? In my way of thinking, no. SARS has killed only 774 people worldwide whereas the flu can kill that many people a day.

I'm more interested in coronavirus deaths than its unknowable CFR or my crude analog, which has now been officially named the Irresponsible Luuuc Cases to Deaths Ratio (ILCDR). For example, the Ohio Department of Health was all over the news yesterday because their expert claims that there are already 100,000 cases of coronavirus undiagnosed in Ohio. Well, if that's true, I don't think coronavirus is a particularly worrisome disease, given that there have been no deaths in Ohio.

Maybe the University of Minnesota's infectious disease expert, Dr. Michael Osterholm, will ultimately be right. He "conservatively" predicts 480,000 deaths in the U.S. over the next three to seven months. That would be 5,217 deaths per day for the next three months or 2,285 deaths per day for the next seven months. Until something like that happens, I consider him a politicized scaremonger.

But let's use his number of 480,000. Suppose coronavirus sickened that many people over its course but we were confident it would kill no one -- they all get some respiratory distress and maybe a short fever, but everyone lives. Would we be having this level of media hysteria, public panic, governmental intervention, and consequent economic disaster?

NO. Yet the death needle really hasn't yet moved that far above zero.

President Obama didn't declare the H1N1 (swine) flu a national emergency until seven months (October) after the first cases appeared in the U.S. (March) and when the total deaths were approaching 4,000 (November). Even then and thereafter, there was little media attention.

NEVERTHELESS, I'm in favor of all the social distancing and community mitigation measures in the U.S., mainly because they will reduce the infection rates for the flu and all the other communicable diseases with big total death numbers.
jammerbirdi



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PostPosted: 03/14/20 5:32 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

FrozenLVFan wrote:
jammerbirdi wrote:
Why is the United States behind any other country on the timeline?


Timing of testing. And extent of international travel. It seems likely we had infected people from China hitting our airports sooner than Burkina Faso's airports.



Contemplate this. Italy has 21,157 cases. 1,966 recovered. 1,441 dead. Remainder still active cases. This happened in a country whose first world hospitals were overwhelmed by the number of seriously ill patients.


I'll be the first to admit that I have parts of my brain that are like warped. Where I just can't follow things. And none of this gets through my brain warp and answers my questions.

And I think I'm maybe conflating and questioning justin's assertions with yours.

Let me explain my questions and where they're coming from.

So my question is basically, how are we behind other countries? Not necessarily in testing. But in the timeline of misery and death and overwhelmed health care systems. Why would we be?

Follow me here. The US has the largest population of Chinese people outside Asia. Even including all of Asia we are third. Think of LAX, if you've ever been there. A sea of humans going and coming to and from China move through that airport every single day, unlike any other place in the world outside Asia. Dispersing through LA, California, the rest of the country. And all the other airports not just in California but in the rest of the country. And baggage handled by Chinese baggage handlers and then here in the US. People going home after and spreading germs everywhere.

There are 5 million Chinese living in the US.
300K in Italy.
3K in Iran.

You want to contemplate something, contemplate that.

The US is the worlds largest economy. With huge business interests moving constantly from here to there and back. California and the Port of Los Angeles is the point of arrival of most of the shipping from China into this country and it is a MASSIVE amount of goods coming into this country from China on ships manned by Chinese sailors.

Nothing in the world compares to the amount of human traffic and goods moving between China and the US. We would have gotten COVID-19 first and in numbers that should have first infected residents here to a numerical degree that dwarfs any other place in the world.

How can we be behind these other countries on the timeline?

If we are, how did that happen?

And I know we're behind on testing so we don't know how many actually have it. I'm the one here pretty much assuming MUCH higher infection rates among the population. I don't believe for a minute that we don't have millions infected already. I don't know whether to hope I'm wrong or right there. I don't know whether to shit or wind my watch. (I think after 62 years I finally understand what that saying means.)

And forget death rate per population. Why don't we have widespread deaths in a country this large with us being the first stop for Chinese outside of Asia? Forget all the shortcomings regarding testing. Dead is dead. Overwhelmed hospitals are overwhelmed hospitals. We should be seeing that in this country no matter the testing snafus and if we're not, why?



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Falsehood will fly on the wings of the wind, and carry its tales to every corner of the earth; whilst truth lags behind; her steps slow and solemn, she has neither the vigour nor activity to overtake her enemy. - Thomas Francklin


Last edited by jammerbirdi on 03/14/20 5:39 pm; edited 2 times in total
jammerbirdi



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PostPosted: 03/14/20 5:35 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

So I'm with you, Glenn. Until proven otherwise that is. I'm fickle like that. Still waiting for someone to explain why we're wrong here.



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Falsehood will fly on the wings of the wind, and carry its tales to every corner of the earth; whilst truth lags behind; her steps slow and solemn, she has neither the vigour nor activity to overtake her enemy. - Thomas Francklin
Luuuc



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PostPosted: 03/14/20 5:49 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

jammerbirdi wrote:
there are likely already millions infected with it here in this country

Just wondering where the "likely" in that sentence comes from. That's kind of a massive number to be throwing that word at isn't it? What's the basis?
(Your main point - about fatalities seeming to be relatively low - is a fair question of course)



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jammerbirdi



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PostPosted: 03/14/20 6:06 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Volume, Luuuc. Volume of travel between China and here and number of citizens here vs smaller European countries. And it’s just a guess. A hunch. So you’re right, ‘likely’ is probably the wrong word there. But the governors of both Ohio and New York have suggested publicly that there are likely 100s of thousands infected in their states. Even 25K in each of the 50 states on average is 2.5 million.

It seems like the argument that’s forming on the other side here that’s trying to have its cake and eat it too regarding testing. But I’ll have to come back to that later.



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Falsehood will fly on the wings of the wind, and carry its tales to every corner of the earth; whilst truth lags behind; her steps slow and solemn, she has neither the vigour nor activity to overtake her enemy. - Thomas Francklin
FrozenLVFan



Joined: 08 Jul 2014
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PostPosted: 03/14/20 6:58 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Jammer,

I think one of the answers regarding the timeline differential is population density. Italy 532 people/sq mile. US 94 people/sq mi. And highly variable demographics. Contrast CA with northern New England, which has a very, very low Chinese population. The virus had to hopscotch from east Asia to Italy, and from Europe to northern N.E. Three of NH's first cases had recently returned from vacation in Italy, two people caught it from them, and the third caught in MA. Minimal risk here from direct Chinese travelers.

And if our timeline is behind, our case severity is lagging behind as well. People don't catch CV and instantly become critically ill.


jammerbirdi



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PostPosted: 03/14/20 7:24 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

What about all the traffic from China into California. And human density at the airport. And California population density?



_________________
Falsehood will fly on the wings of the wind, and carry its tales to every corner of the earth; whilst truth lags behind; her steps slow and solemn, she has neither the vigour nor activity to overtake her enemy. - Thomas Francklin
GlennMacGrady



Joined: 03 Jan 2005
Posts: 6248
Location: Heisenberg


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PostPosted: 03/14/20 7:48 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

jammerbirdi wrote:
So I'm with you, Glenn. Until proven otherwise that is. I'm fickle like that. Still waiting for someone to explain why we're wrong here.


Good, I need some company.

I've decided to be the site optimist. No, that's too strong a word. I'm the site pessimist about all the pessimism. I'll stay the course as long as the numbers support it. If the numbers explode, I'll cave fast and go looking for one to hide in.
jammerbirdi



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PostPosted: 03/14/20 8:04 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

So population density of Italy is 532/sqm. LA is 8532. Shocked LA County is 2300. Around 20 million people in LA, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino counties. That's approximately one third of the population of Italy or France or Spain etc. in a contiguous urban sprawl of just four Southern California counties. LAX being the primary airport to all.



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Falsehood will fly on the wings of the wind, and carry its tales to every corner of the earth; whilst truth lags behind; her steps slow and solemn, she has neither the vigour nor activity to overtake her enemy. - Thomas Francklin
tfan



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PostPosted: 03/14/20 10:37 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

jammerbirdi wrote:
So population density of Italy is 532. LA is 8532. LA County is 2300. Around 20 million people in LA, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino counties.


Population density of Milan, Italy : 19,551 (1,372,075 people in 70.18 square miles).




Last edited by tfan on 03/14/20 10:59 pm; edited 1 time in total
tfan



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PostPosted: 03/14/20 10:43 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

GlennMacGrady wrote:

Maybe the University of Minnesota's infectious disease expert, Dr. Michael Osterholm, will ultimately be right. He "conservatively" predicts 480,000 deaths in the U.S. over the next three to seven months. That would be 5,217 deaths per day for the next three months or 2,285 deaths per day for the next seven months. Until something like that happens, I consider him a politicized scaremonger.


Why do you think an infectious disease expert is making a politicized prediction?


tfan



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PostPosted: 03/14/20 10:51 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

GlennMacGrady wrote:


Quote:
Active Cases: 2,241

Currently Infected Patients:

-- 2,231 (100%) in Mild Condition

-- 10 (0%) Serious or Critical


There were 31 people in the hospital in Silicon Valley on 3/12 and 38 on 3/14. Wouldn't that indicate a serious case or is serious a code for "in the ICU"?


GlennMacGrady



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PostPosted: 03/14/20 11:32 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Update 3: Changes in 24 Hours since Last Update, or as noted

Worldwide:
- confirmed cases increased by 11,207 from 145,369 to 156,396
- deaths increased by 404 from 5,429 to 5,833
- death rate stayed same at 3.73%

China:
- confirmed cases increased by 24 from 80,971 to 80,995
- deaths increased by 10 from 3,193 to 3,203
- death rate increased from 3.94% to 3.95%

U.S.:
- confirmed cases increased by 777 from 2,174 to 2,951
- deaths increased by 10 from 47 to 57
- death rate decreased from 2.16% to 1.93%

Italy:
- confirmed cases increased by 3,497 from 17,660 to 21,157
- deaths increased by 215 from 1,226 to 1,441
- death rate decreased from 6.94% to 6.81%

Washington state (first calculation):
- 40/642 = 6.23%

New York (first calculation):
- 2/613 = 0.33%

California (first calculation):
- 5/368 = 1.36%


Here are the details of the 10 deaths today.

1 in Colorado (the 1st): woman in her 80's with underlying health conditions

1 in Louisiana (the 1st): 58 year old individual with underlying health conditions

1 in Virginia (the 1st): man in his 70's

1 in Florida (the 3rd): 68 year old woman who tested positive after travel to Asia

1 in California (the 5th): woman in her 80's who may have had underlying medical conditions

2 in New York (first two):
- 82 year old woman with underlying respiratory illness (emphysema)
- 65 year old man with "other significant health problems"

3 in Washington (total now 40):
- woman in her 70's
- 2 men in their 80's at the infamous Life Care Center of Kirkland (pictured below), which now has 27 deaths

GlennMacGrady



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PostPosted: 03/15/20 12:06 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

tfan wrote:
GlennMacGrady wrote:

Maybe the University of Minnesota's infectious disease expert, Dr. Michael Osterholm, will ultimately be right. He "conservatively" predicts 480,000 deaths in the U.S. over the next three to seven months. That would be 5,217 deaths per day for the next three months or 2,285 deaths per day for the next seven months. Until something like that happens, I consider him a politicized scaremonger.


Why do you think an infectious disease expert is making a politicized prediction?


Didn't mean his prediction is political, but that he in general clearly seems to be. I saw him on an interview show and he didn't answer any questions about his prediction or model, but rather spent his entire time ranting about how incompetent and frightening Seema Verma is, partly because she didn't know exactly how many respirators are in the U.S. stockpile. Verma is the head of CMS in the Trump administration. He sounded to me like prototypical TDS.
GlennMacGrady



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PostPosted: 03/15/20 12:09 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

tfan wrote:
GlennMacGrady wrote:


Quote:
Active Cases: 2,241

Currently Infected Patients:

-- 2,231 (100%) in Mild Condition

-- 10 (0%) Serious or Critical


There were 31 people in the hospital in Silicon Valley on 3/12 and 38 on 3/14. Wouldn't that indicate a serious case or is serious a code for "in the ICU"?


Don't know. I just copied the table, which had no definitions of terms. But I sort of assume it relates to this hospital lingo:

Quote:
In the US, doctors use a series of definition that are part of the American Hospital Association Guidelines:

Undetermined: Patient awaiting physician and assessment.

Good: Vitals signs are stable and within normal limits. Patient is conscious and comfortable. Indicators are excellent.

Fair: Vital signs stable and within normal limits. Patient is conscious, but may be uncomfortable. Indicators are favorable.

Serious: Vital signs may be unstable and not within normal limits. Patient is acutely ill. Indicators are questionable.

Critical: Vital signs are unstable and not within normal limits. Patient may be unconscious. Indicators are unfavorable.
J-Spoon



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PostPosted: 03/15/20 12:58 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I realize that this question is part of the rationale for this thread but the "optimistic" view of this thread keeps bringing me back to one question.

If things aren't that bad, or that big of a deal why are we having an unprecedented reaction?

Sports have stopped, all sports have stopped in America has that ever happened?, tons of people are being put out of work as a precaution, a precaution that is going to undo any economic progress individuals, families and regions have made over the past decade, school's are closing left and right for weeks at a time with no real plan on how families are going to re-organize their lives to cope with the new situations of what to do with the kids during school hours NY subways are near empty (though there were tons of people in Central Park today because it is literally one of the very few places in NY you can go right now), people from Europe can't come to America, Europe! People are getting into fist fights over hand sanitizer and the only bread on the shelves in NY is potato bread, none of this has ever happened in my life time (except maybe pre-Hurricane Sandy for the potato bread) and I existed in the seventies, so what is going on? Are we all going to die? Is this mass hysteria? Is this some new iteration of cancel culture? the unprecedented reaction is in some ways fueling the panic and anxiety that is sweeping the country.


Luuuc



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PostPosted: 03/15/20 1:07 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Let's say hypothetically that it is fatal for 0.3% of people who get it, so the potential death toll in the USA is 1 million people. What level of disruption is warranted to prevent that outcome?



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readyAIMfire53



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PostPosted: 03/15/20 1:30 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

There's a reason Trump's main plan to keep the known cases as low as possible by refusing to begin massive testing. He did it so people would post that this is a hoax and overblown by the media. When mass testing begins (such as drive through testing in Santa Clara County, CA and New Rochelle, Westchester County, NY, there will be massive increases in number of people known to be ill with COVID-19.

Another point to consider: how many people just on this site are at high risk of death if they contract this virus? How many of us are over 60, 70, 80? How many of us have serious underlying medical conditions, which is highly correlated with death from this disease.

It's not THEM. It's US. According to all the professionals who have been doing this full time for a living, US numbers of infection and death will rise.

Italy has a higher number of hospital beds per population than US does. Food for thought. If you've ever been to the ER thinking you're about to die and had to wait for a bed to open up, then you know how many vacant beds exist in hospitals. Very few. I was with a friend last month who had pneumonia and could barely breathe. She waited 10 hours in an ER hallway for a bed to open.

The explanation for why the US has fewer known cases and known deaths of this disease is completely explained by lack of testing. Everyone who died of pneumonia before ANY testing was available is not known and will likely not be known unless someone saved swabs and decides to test them.



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FrozenLVFan



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PostPosted: 03/15/20 1:49 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

readyAIMfire53 wrote:
There's a reason Trump's main plan to keep the known cases as low as possible by refusing to begin massive testing. He did it so people would post that this is a hoax and overblown by the media. When mass testing begins (such as drive through testing in Santa Clara County, CA and New Rochelle, Westchester County, NY, there will be massive increases in number of people known to be ill with COVID-19.

Another point to consider: how many people just on this site are at high risk of death if they contract this virus? How many of us are over 60, 70, 80? How many of us have serious underlying medical conditions, which is highly correlated with death from this disease.

It's not THEM. It's US. According to all the professionals who have been doing this full time for a living, US numbers of infection and death will rise.

Italy has a higher number of hospital beds per population than US does. Food for thought. If you've ever been to the ER thinking you're about to die and had to wait for a bed to open up, then you know how many vacant beds exist in hospitals. Very few. I was with a friend last month who had pneumonia and could barely breathe. She waited 10 hours in an ER hallway for a bed to open.

The explanation for why the US has fewer known cases and known deaths of this disease is completely explained by lack of testing. Everyone who died of pneumonia before ANY testing was available is not known and will likely not be known unless someone saved swabs and decides to test them.


Italy's doctors found that high blood pressure was serious enough to be predictive of non-survival. The current death rate there is over 7%. Their doctors are having to decide who gets admitted and who gets ICU-level care because of lack of beds. Not only do they have more hospital beds per capita than we do, our beds are already full because we have no redundancies in healthcare here due to continual cost-cutting.


Luuuc wrote:
Let's say hypothetically that it is fatal for 0.3% of people who get it, so the potential death toll in the USA is 1 million people. What level of disruption is warranted to prevent that outcome?


Let's say hypothetically that our experience is like Italy's. That's 23M deaths.


jammerbirdi



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PostPosted: 03/15/20 2:04 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Well, I'm more curious or intrigued by these questions of why the US, which includes California, which I've sort of explained as to why I think it would have been the jumping off point for coronavirus outside of China, would lag ten days or two weeks or whatever behind say Italy or Iran in terms of illness and death.

I am not thinking optimistically about where this is now or where it's going even in the US. I'm questioning. I'm deeply concerned that this will kill untold numbers of Americans and that that's most likely going to look a LOT different than an even bad seasonal flu. I think 1918 could be coming up fast in our rear view mirror. I know that none of us here or any other half-intelligent persons would know that no one can know what's going to happen anywhere.

But we can talk about it, try to figure out what the fuck any of this means. Collectively, in the big picture, it might not mean anything other than chance circumstances that are causing the differences in numbers around the globe.

So the only thing I can watch on CNN any more is the late night international desk vibe CNN Newsroom Live where they actually have remote reports and pieces like the old CNN used to run all the time. Boring but that's the way the news used to be. But certainly not boring at the time of a once in a century global pandemic bearing down on the human race.

So let me relay something I just heard that touches on what we're talking about here. I have a new ThinkPad X1 Carbon so I'm loving this legendary ThinkPad keyboard. So I'll transcribe it. It's from an infectious disease doctor in Australia. Oh that CNN could be like this all the time. Anyway, this seems to indicate that experts are noticing how the numbers are differing in different countries.

"We are seeing some disparities. The speed of the outbreak in Italy is much faster than in some other parts of the world. And part of that could be related to early testing and isolation of people and the spent capacity of one's health care system. And even the death rates among certain countries is varying. In Germany, it's less than one percent, whereas in Italy it's about 6.7 percent. And both countries have thousands of cases."



_________________
Falsehood will fly on the wings of the wind, and carry its tales to every corner of the earth; whilst truth lags behind; her steps slow and solemn, she has neither the vigour nor activity to overtake her enemy. - Thomas Francklin
tfan



Joined: 31 May 2010
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PostPosted: 03/15/20 2:18 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

jammerbirdi wrote:
Well, I'm more curious or intrigued by these questions of why the US, which includes California, which I've sort of explained as to why I think it would have been the jumping off point for coronavirus outside of China, would lag ten days or two weeks or whatever behind say Italy or Iran in terms of illness and death.


I don't know where the article is now but I was reading about Milan and some resident was talking about all the Chinese students at a local university who had gone home for the Chinese New Year celebration (Chinese New Year 1/25/2020) and come back. The first two cases in Italy were a Chinese couple who were on vacation from China. The third was an Italian who came back from working in China.

But yeah, even if Northern Italy has connections to China, I would expect California to have a lot more.

Found this article quoting an American in Italy:
‘Shut It Down’: Colorado Woman In Italy Issues Stark Warning On Coronavirus

Quote:
Unks said her husband, who runs a factory, has been allowed to work but will soon be working from home. She said she and her daughter stay home and only leave to walk their dog or buy groceries. She said it is the only way to help prevent the spread of the disease and hopefully avoid having U.S. hospitals overwhelmed as has happened in Italy.




Last edited by tfan on 03/15/20 2:30 am; edited 1 time in total
FrozenLVFan



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PostPosted: 03/15/20 2:28 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

jammerbirdi wrote:
Well, I'm more curious or intrigued by these questions of why the US, which includes California, which I've sort of explained as to why I think it would have been the jumping off point for coronavirus outside of China, would lag ten days or two weeks or whatever behind say Italy or Iran in terms of illness and death.

I am not thinking optimistically about where this is now or where it's going even in the US. I'm questioning. I'm deeply concerned that this will kill untold numbers of Americans and that that's most likely going to look a LOT different than an even bad seasonal flu. I think 1918 could be coming up fast in our rear view mirror. I know that none of us here or any other half-intelligent persons would know that no one can know what's going to happen anywhere.

But we can talk about it, try to figure out what the fuck any of this means. Collectively, in the big picture, it might not mean anything other than chance circumstances that are causing the differences in numbers around the globe.

So the only thing I can watch on CNN any more is the late night international desk vibe CNN Newsroom Live where they actually have remote reports and pieces like the old CNN used to run all the time. Boring but that's the way the news used to be. But certainly not boring at the time of a once in a century global pandemic bearing down on the human race.

So let me relay something I just heard that touches on what we're talking about here. I have a new ThinkPad X1 Carbon so I'm loving this legendary ThinkPad keyboard. So I'll transcribe it. It's from an infectious disease doctor in Australia. Oh that CNN could be like this all the time. Anyway, this seems to indicate that experts are noticing how the numbers are differing in different countries.

"We are seeing some disparities. The speed of the outbreak in Italy is much faster than in some other parts of the world. And part of that could be related to early testing and isolation of people and the spent capacity of one's health care system. And even the death rates among certain countries is varying. In Germany, it's less than one percent, whereas in Italy it's about 6.7 percent. And both countries have thousands of cases."


Germany's outbreak started after Italy's, so they have more patients in the early stages of the disease.
Germany currently has 1/5 as many positive patients as Italy.
Germany has 2.5 times as many hospital beds as Italy.

Fewer seriously ill patients and more resources equal a lower death rate, all other things being equal (which I'm sure they aren't).


Just found this website, which has a ton of data. The section is rather alarming that shows the current doubling time for the number of positive patients is 3 days in the US and most of Europe.
https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus


jammerbirdi



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PostPosted: 03/15/20 2:49 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

FrozenLVFan wrote:


Just found this website, which has a ton of data. The section is rather alarming that shows the current doubling time for the number of positive patients is 3 days in the US and most of Europe.
https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus


Well, testing.

I mean, the testing madness (although perfectly understandable) threw the idea of tracking the spread of cases as doubling every six days way out the window. We had 537 cases last Sunday. Should have had 1100 today. But, you know, the best laid plans of mice and just like that we have over 3700 infected in the US.



_________________
Falsehood will fly on the wings of the wind, and carry its tales to every corner of the earth; whilst truth lags behind; her steps slow and solemn, she has neither the vigour nor activity to overtake her enemy. - Thomas Francklin
readyAIMfire53



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PostPosted: 03/15/20 3:24 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

jammerbirdi wrote:
FrozenLVFan wrote:


Just found this website, which has a ton of data. The section is rather alarming that shows the current doubling time for the number of positive patients is 3 days in the US and most of Europe.
https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus


Well, testing.

I mean, the testing madness (although perfectly understandable) threw the idea of tracking the spread of cases as doubling every six days way out the window. We had 537 cases last Sunday. Should have had 1100 today. But, you know, the best laid plans of mice and just like that we have over 3700 infected in the US.


You do realize that testing kits are still not widely available. Also with kits being used in the US, it's 2 days to get the results. Senegal's kits get results within 24 hours. Yes, shit hole countries are ahead of the great US.



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Luuuc



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PostPosted: 03/15/20 3:38 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

readyAIMfire53 wrote:
jammerbirdi wrote:
FrozenLVFan wrote:


Just found this website, which has a ton of data. The section is rather alarming that shows the current doubling time for the number of positive patients is 3 days in the US and most of Europe.
https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus


Well, testing.

I mean, the testing madness (although perfectly understandable) threw the idea of tracking the spread of cases as doubling every six days way out the window. We had 537 cases last Sunday. Should have had 1100 today. But, you know, the best laid plans of mice and just like that we have over 3700 infected in the US.


You do realize that testing kits are still not widely available. Also with kits being used in the US, it's 2 days to get the results. Senegal's kits get results within 24 hours. Yes, shit hole countries are ahead of the great US.

Get more of the kits used for Rudy Gobert. You know ... the rich people kits. Those ones are quick.



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