RebKell's Junkie Boards
Board Junkies Forums
 
Log in Register FAQ Memberlist Search RebKell's Junkie Boards Forum Index

Study: Anger-negativity the most effective halftime speech

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    RebKell's Junkie Boards Forum Index » NCAA Women's Basketball - General Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
GlennMacGrady



Joined: 03 Jan 2005
Posts: 5744
Location: Heisenberg


Back to top
PostPosted: 08/20/19 1:12 am    ::: Study: Anger-negativity the most effective halftime speech Reply Reply with quote

Quote:
Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley’s Haas School of Business analyzed hundreds of halftime speeches and final scores from high school and college basketball games, and found that players seem to perform better after a harsh, more negative halftime speech from their coach. In fact, researchers discovered a significant relationship between the level of negativity a coach projects during a halftime speech and second-half scoring outcomes. The more negativity, the more the team outscored their opponents, that is at least up to a certain threshold point.


https://www.studyfinds.org/for-coaches-anger-more-effective-than-positivity-when-it-comes-to-halftime-speeches/
osubeavers



Joined: 07 Jan 2017
Posts: 51
Location: West Hills, Portland, OR


Back to top
PostPosted: 09/04/19 10:38 pm    ::: Re: Study: Anger-negativity the most effective halftime spee Reply Reply with quote

GlennMacGrady wrote:
Quote:
Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley’s Haas School of Business analyzed hundreds of halftime speeches and final scores from high school and college basketball games, and found that players seem to perform better after a harsh, more negative halftime speech from their coach. In fact, researchers discovered a significant relationship between the level of negativity a coach projects during a halftime speech and second-half scoring outcomes. The more negativity, the more the team outscored their opponents, that is at least up to a certain threshold point.


https://www.studyfinds.org/for-coaches-anger-more-effective-than-positivity-when-it-comes-to-halftime-speeches/


I wonder if the results for men’s and women’s teams were any different, or essentially identical?



_________________
Stepping out of a triangle into striped light - Everything is wrong, at the same time it's RIGHT!
ClayK



Joined: 11 Oct 2005
Posts: 10096



Back to top
PostPosted: 09/05/19 9:07 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

At the high school level, a coach can afford to focus more on behaving the way the coach feels is best, as winning a couple more games usually doesn't make that much difference. So even though it looks like being a jerk in the locker room is the best way to get a better performance, a high school coach can opt to be a better role model, say, and not go off on young people just to win a game.

But when careers depend on wins and losses -- and not just the head coach's career -- then the equation changes.

It's unfortunate that this is how people are ... wouldn't it be a nicer world if they responded better to positivity than negativity?



_________________
Oṃ Tāre Tuttāre Ture Svāhā
willtalk



Joined: 13 Apr 2012
Posts: 801
Location: NorCal


Back to top
PostPosted: 09/05/19 3:53 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

A lot also depends on the makeup of that high school team. Are their basketball careers going to end in high school? Or do they have aspirations of getting a P5 D 1 scholarship leading to a professional career? Many players have a hard time adjusting to the higher expectations and rigorous programs they will face in college. A program geared to more closely resemble what they will face at the next level would help that transition.

Much would depend on the program objective. Not all high school or college programs are the same. That is why players should have the option to chose the ones that meet and aline with their own future plans.



_________________
No one one is ever as good as their best game, nor as bad as their worst.
ClayK



Joined: 11 Oct 2005
Posts: 10096



Back to top
PostPosted: 09/06/19 9:30 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

willtalk wrote:
A lot also depends on the makeup of that high school team. Are their basketball careers going to end in high school? Or do they have aspirations of getting a P5 D 1 scholarship leading to a professional career? Many players have a hard time adjusting to the higher expectations and rigorous programs they will face in college. A program geared to more closely resemble what they will face at the next level would help that transition.

Much would depend on the program objective. Not all high school or college programs are the same. That is why players should have the option to chose the ones that meet and aline with their own future plans.


I've coached for a long time and worked with 25 or so D1 players -- and not one (so far) has been at the Power 5 level. It's very, very rare to have more than one P5 kid unless you're a recruiting school and it's unfair to shape your program and your coaching around one player. To me, at least, the experience of number 12 on the roster is as important as the experience of number 1.

And it's difficult to have a strong double standard, and act differently to the P5 girl. You can expect more, and demand more, but you can't be a completely different coach to the star, I don't think.



_________________
Oṃ Tāre Tuttāre Ture Svāhā
Conway Gamecock



Joined: 23 Jan 2015
Posts: 789
Location: Here


Back to top
PostPosted: 09/07/19 5:39 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I'd like to know if the negativity is more team-directed, or more game-performance oriented. Like, does the coach yell at the team for playing lousy? Is he targeting the lack of execution, poor focus, team-oriented things like that?

It's one thing to criticize how the team is playing, if the team is playing lousy. What we've seen from some coaches seem to be more individual-targeted, and personal attacks that are on cruelty level. Threatening players with scholarships, or personally attacking players for their life-styles, who they hang out with, their clothes or how they wear their hairstyles.

I mean, someone could possibly point to this research as a push back at the numerous criticisms and firings of coaches for player harassment, cruelty, things like that, and try to defend those acts as normal coaching techniques to elicit better playing performances. But obviously as the OP's quote states, there are "certain threshold" points.

There's a distinct difference between constructive criticisms and destructive criticisms....


ClayK



Joined: 11 Oct 2005
Posts: 10096



Back to top
PostPosted: 09/07/19 9:28 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Conway Gamecock wrote:
I'd like to know if the negativity is more team-directed, or more game-performance oriented. Like, does the coach yell at the team for playing lousy? Is he targeting the lack of execution, poor focus, team-oriented things like that?

It's one thing to criticize how the team is playing, if the team is playing lousy. What we've seen from some coaches seem to be more individual-targeted, and personal attacks that are on cruelty level. Threatening players with scholarships, or personally attacking players for their life-styles, who they hang out with, their clothes or how they wear their hairstyles.

I mean, someone could possibly point to this research as a push back at the numerous criticisms and firings of coaches for player harassment, cruelty, things like that, and try to defend those acts as normal coaching techniques to elicit better playing performances. But obviously as the OP's quote states, there are "certain threshold" points.

There's a distinct difference between constructive criticisms and destructive criticisms....


My impression of the research was that it was the usual halftime stuff -- "You're not rebounding," "They're getting every loose ball," "If you play this badly, you're going to embarrass yourself and the program." Those kinds of comments are almost always group-oriented, as you don't have time to single out individuals, except in rare cases.

I'm sure some coaches do go after individuals in the locker room, and perhaps in a demeaning way, but you can't do that very often and keep getting results. But apparently stomping into the locker room and yelling about how lousy everyone is playing is an effective strategy.

I guess that's just how people's brains are structured ...



_________________
Oṃ Tāre Tuttāre Ture Svāhā
Howee



Joined: 27 Nov 2009
Posts: 12276
Location: OREGON (in my heart)


Back to top
PostPosted: 09/07/19 3:00 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
I guess that's just how people's brains are structured ...

I might sound sexist here, but....has anyone considered the difference that gender makes in this equation? I have coached both males and females, and....they're different!! Shocked

I never met ANY kid (male or female) that benefited from individualized berating. And while the *tough talk* helped in both settings, I think it's fair to say that it impacted more females in a negative way than it did males.

Obviously, generalizations are imperfect; females like Sabrina Ionescu, Lauren Cox, Arike Ogunbowale, etc., might be half a universe apart from a #12 bench player at Albany or Moorehead state in both their skill sets and their mental/emotional toughness. But I do think there's a real gender differential in this idea.

And...in *our* game, I ponder if the young ladies are differently receptive to harshness from a female coach or a male coach, or....no difference?



_________________
Oregon: Go Ducks!
FrozenLVFan



Joined: 08 Jul 2014
Posts: 1334



Back to top
PostPosted: 09/07/19 4:26 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

The really good coaches know which buttons to push for individual players to get the most out of them, in other words, which ones need a kick in the *** and which respond better to gentler encouragement. However, the coach needs to bring a lot of energy to the half-time talk and sometimes that going to involve some yelling.


myrtle



Joined: 02 May 2008
Posts: 25702



Back to top
PostPosted: 09/08/19 10:01 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I've only worked with young kids and certainly with them, the emphasis is on teaching but having fun regardless of outcome.
Having played at various levels, I had much more respect for coaches who were honest, clear, but respectful than those that would start yelling and stomping around, which always seemed pretty juvenile. I really feel it's pretty individual how different people respond to different stimuli. And almost always individual criticism is better one-on-one than embarrassing a kid in front of his/her peers. JMO.



_________________
“Try to be a rainbow in someone's cloud.”
― Maya Angelou
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    RebKell's Junkie Boards Forum Index » NCAA Women's Basketball - General Discussion All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB 2.0.17 © 2001- 2004 phpBB Group
phpBB Template by Vjacheslav Trushkin