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Kyle Korver Writes About White Privilege

 
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Genero36



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PostPosted: 04/08/19 10:58 am    ::: Kyle Korver Writes About White Privilege Reply Reply with quote


When the police break your teammate’s leg, you’d think it would wake you up a little.

When they arrest him on a New York street, throw him in jail for the night, and leave him with a season-ending injury, you’d think it would sink in. You’d think you’d know there was more to the story.

You’d think.

But nope.

I still remember my reaction when I first heard what happened to Thabo. It was 2015, late in the season. Thabo and I were teammates on the Hawks, and we’d flown into New York late after a game in Atlanta. When I woke up the next morning, our team group text was going nuts. Details were still hazy, but guys were saying, Thabo hurt his leg? During an arrest? Wait — he spent the night in jail?! Everyone was pretty upset and confused.

Well, almost everyone. My response was….. different. I’m embarrassed to admit it.

Which is why I want to share it today.

Before I tell the rest of this story, let me just say real quick — Thabo wasn’t some random teammate of mine, or some guy in the league who I knew a little bit. We’d become legitimate friends that year in our downtime. He was my go-to teammate to talk with about stuff beyond the basketball world. Politics, religion, culture, you name it — Thabo brought a perspective that wasn’t typical of an NBA player. And it’s easy to see why: Before we were teammates in Atlanta, the guy had played professional ball in France, Turkey and Italy. He spoke three languages! Thabo’s mother was from Switzerland, and his father was from South Africa. They lived together in South Africa before Thabo was born, then left because of apartheid.

It didn’t take long for me to figure out that Thabo was one of the most interesting people I’d ever been around. We respected each other. We were cool, you know? We had each other’s backs.

Anyway — on the morning I found out that Thabo had been arrested, want to know what my first thought was? About my friend and teammate? My first thought was: What was Thabo doing out at a club on a back-to-back??

Yeah. Not, How’s he doing? Not, What happened during the arrest?? Not, Something seems off with this story. Nothing like that. Before I knew the full story, and before I’d even had the chance to talk to Thabo….. I sort of blamed Thabo.

I thought, Well, if I’d been in Thabo’s shoes, out at a club late at night, the police wouldn’t have arrested me. Not unless I was doing something wrong.

Cringe.

It’s not like it was a conscious thought. It was pure reflex — the first thing to pop into my head.

And I was worried about him, no doubt.

But still. Cringe.

A few months later, a jury found Thabo not guilty on all charges. He settled with the city over the NYPD’s use of force against him. And then the story just sort of….. disappeared. It fell away from the news. Thabo had surgery and went through rehab. Pretty soon, another NBA season began — and we were back on the court again.

Life went on.

But I still couldn’t shake my discomfort.

I mean, I hadn’t been involved in the incident. I hadn’t even been there. So why did I feel like I’d let my friend down?

Why did I feel like I’d let myself down?

A few weeks ago, something happened at a Jazz home game that brought back many of those old questions.

Maybe you saw it: We were playing against the Thunder, and Russell Westbrook and a fan in the crowd exchanged words during the game. I didn’t actually see or hear what happened, and if you were following on TV or on Twitter, maybe you had a similar initial viewing of it. Then, after the game, one of our reporters asked me for my response to what had gone down between Russ and the fan. I told him I hadn’t seen it — and added something like, But you know Russ. He gets into it with the crowd a lot.

Of course, the full story came out later that night. What actually happened was that a fan had said some really ugly things at close range to Russ. Russ had then responded. After the game, he’d said he felt the comments were racially charged.

The incident struck a nerve with our team.

In a closed-door meeting with the president of the Jazz the next day, my teammates shared stories of similar experiences they’d had — of feeling degraded in ways that went beyond acceptable heckling. One teammate talked about how his mom had called him right after the game, concerned for his safety in SLC. One teammate said the night felt like being “in a zoo.” One of the guys in the meeting was Thabo — he’s my teammate in Utah now. I looked over at him, and remembered his night in NYC.

Everyone was upset. I was upset — and embarrassed, too. But there was another emotion in the room that day, one that was harder to put a finger on. It was almost like….. disappointment, mixed with exhaustion. Guys were just sick and tired of it all.

This wasn’t the first time they’d taken part in conversations about race in their NBA careers, and it wasn’t the first time they’d had to address the hateful actions of others. And one big thing that got brought up a lot in the meeting was how incidents like this — they weren’t only about the people directly involved. This wasn’t only about Russ and some heckler. It was about more than that.

It was about what it means just to exist right now — as a person of color in a mostly white space.


It was about racism in America.

Before the meeting ended, I joined the team’s demand for a swift response and a promise from the Jazz organization that it would address the concerns we had. I think my teammates and I all felt it was a step in the right direction.

But I don’t think anyone felt satisfied.

There’s an elephant in the room that I’ve been thinking about a lot over these last few weeks. It’s the fact that, demographically, if we’re being honest: I have more in common with the fans in the crowd at your average NBA game than I have with the players on the court.

And after the events in Salt Lake City last month, and as we’ve been discussing them since, I’ve really started to recognize the role those demographics play in my privilege. It’s like — I may be Thabo’s friend, or Ekpe’s teammate, or Russ’s colleague; I may work with those guys. And I absolutely 100% stand with them.

But I look like the other guy.

And whether I like it or not? I’m beginning to understand how that means something.

What I’m realizing is, no matter how passionately I commit to being an ally, and no matter how unwavering my support is for NBA and WNBA players of color….. I’m still in this conversation from the privileged perspective of opting in to it. Which of course means that on the flip side, I could just as easily opt out of it. Every day, I’m given that choice — I’m granted that privilege — based on the color of my skin.

In other words, I can say every right thing in the world: I can voice my solidarity with Russ after what happened in Utah. I can evolve my position on what happened to Thabo in New York. I can be that weird dude in Get Out bragging about how he’d have voted for Obama a third term. I can condemn every racist heckler I’ve ever known.

But I can also fade into the crowd, and my face can blend in with the faces of those hecklers, any time I want.

I realize that now. And maybe in years past, just realizing something would’ve felt like progress. But it’s NOT years past — it’s today. And I know I have to do better. So I’m trying to push myself further.

I’m trying to ask myself what I should actually do.

How can I — as a white man, part of this systemic problem — become part of the solution when it comes to racism in my workplace? In my community? In this country?

These are the questions that I’ve been asking myself lately.

And I don’t think I have all the answers yet — but here are the ones that are starting to ring the most true:

I have to continue to educate myself on the history of racism in America.

I have to listen. I’ll say it again, because it’s that important. I have to listen.

I have to support leaders who see racial justice as fundamental — as something that’s at the heart of nearly every major issue in our country today. And I have to support policies that do the same.

I have to do my best to recognize when to get out of the way — in order to amplify the voices of marginalized groups that so often get lost.

But maybe more than anything?

I know that, as a white man, I have to hold my fellow white men accountable.

We all have to hold each other accountable.

And we all have to be accountable — period. Not just for our own actions, but also for the ways that our inaction can create a “safe” space for toxic behavior.

And I think the standard that we have to hold ourselves to, in this crucial moment….. it’s higher than it’s ever been. We have to be active. We have to be actively supporting the causes of those who’ve been marginalized — precisely because they’ve been marginalized.

Two concepts that I’ve been thinking about a lot lately are guilt and responsibility.

When it comes to racism in America, I think that guilt and responsibility tend to be seen as more or less the same thing. But I’m beginning to understand how there’s a real difference.

As white people, are we guilty for the sins of our forefathers? No, I don’t think so.

But are we responsible for them? Yes, I believe we are.

And I guess I’ve come to realize that when we talk about solutions to systemic racism — police reform, workplace diversity, affirmative action, better access to healthcare, even reparations? It’s not about guilt. It’s not about pointing fingers, or passing blame.


It’s about responsibility. It’s about understanding that when we’ve said the word “equality,” for generations, what we’ve really meant is equality for a certain group of people. It’s about understanding that when we’ve said the word “inequality,” for generations, what we’ve really meant is slavery, and its aftermath — which is still being felt to this day. It’s about understanding on a fundamental level that black people and white people, they still have it different in America. And that those differences come from an ugly history….. not some random divide.

And it’s about understanding that Black Lives Matter, and movements like it, matter, because — well, let’s face it: I probably would’ve been safe on the street that one night in New York. And Thabo wasn’t. And I was safe on the court that one night in Utah. And Russell wasn’t.

But as disgraceful as it is that we have to deal with racist hecklers in NBA arenas in 2019? The truth is, you could argue that that kind of racism is “easier” to deal with.

Because at least in those cases, the racism is loud and clear. There’s no ambiguity — not in the act itself, and thankfully not in the response: we throw the guy out of the building, and then we ban him for life.

But in many ways the more dangerous form of racism isn’t that loud and stupid kind. It isn’t the kind that announces itself when it walks into the arena. It’s the quiet and subtle kind. The kind that almost hides itself in plain view. It’s the person who does and says all the “right” things in public: They’re perfectly friendly when they meet a person of color. They’re very polite. But in private? Well….. they sort of wish that everyone would stop making everything “about race” all the time.

It’s the kind of racism that can seem almost invisible — which is one of the main reasons why it’s allowed to persist.

And so, again, banning a guy like Russ’s heckler? To me, that’s the “easy” part. But if we’re really going to make a difference as a league, as a community, and as a country on this issue….. it’s like I said — I just think we need to push ourselves another step further.

First, by identifying that less visible, less obvious behavior as what it is: racism.

And then second, by denouncing that racism — actively, and at every level.

That’s the bare minimum of where we have to get to, I think, if we’re going to consider the NBA — or any workplace — as anything close to part of the solution in 2019.

I’ll wrap this up in a minute — but first I have one last thought.

The NBA is over 75% players of color.

Seventy-five percent.

People of color, they built this league. They’ve grown this league. People of color have made this league into what it is today. And I guess I just wanted to say that if you can’t find it in your heart to support them — now? And I mean actively support them?

If the best that you can do for their cause is to passively “tolerate” it? If that’s the standard we’re going to hold ourselves to — to blend in, and opt out?

Well, that’s not good enough. It’s not even close.

I know I’m in a strange position, as one of the more recognized white players in the NBA. It’s a position that comes with a lot of….. interesting undertones. And it’s a position that makes me a symbol for a lot of things, for a lot of people — often people who don’t know anything about me. Usually, I just ignore them. But this doesn’t feel like a “usually” moment.

This feels like a moment to draw a line in the sand.

I believe that what’s happening to people of color in this country — right now, in 2019 — is wrong.

The fact that black Americans are more than five times as likely to be incarcerated as white Americans is wrong. The fact that black Americans are more than twice as likely to live in poverty as white Americans is wrong. The fact that black unemployment rates nationally are double that of overall unemployment rates is wrong. The fact that black imprisonment rates for drug charges are almost six times higher nationally than white imprisonment rates for drug charges is wrong. The fact that black Americans own approximately one-tenth of the wealth that white Americans own is wrong.

The fact that inequality is built so deeply into so many of our most trusted institutions is wrong.

And I believe it’s the responsibility of anyone on the privileged end of those inequalities to help make things right.

So if you don’t want to know anything about me, outside of basketball, then listen — I get it. But if you do want to know something? Know I believe that.

Know that about me.

If you’re wearing my jersey at a game? Know that about me. If you’re planning to buy my jersey for someone else…… know that about me. If you’re following me on social media….. know that about me. If you’re coming to Jazz games and rooting for me….. know that about me.

And if you’re claiming my name, or likeness, for your own cause, in any way….. know that about me. Know that I believe this matters.

Thanks for reading.

Time for me to shut up and listen



https://www.theplayerstribune.com/en-us/contributors/kyle-korver



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CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 04/08/19 1:10 pm    ::: Re: Kyle Korver Writes About White Privilege Reply Reply with quote

Genero36 wrote:
Kyle Korver Writes About White Privilege


Genero, thank you for sharing this. It was a very interesting read.

You share a lot of interesting articles/videos, so if I do not thank you enough for doing so, please let me do so now.


Genero36



Joined: 24 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: 04/08/19 1:36 pm    ::: Re: Kyle Korver Writes About White Privilege Reply Reply with quote

CamrnCrz1974 wrote:
You share a lot of interesting articles/videos, so if I do not thank you enough for doing so, please let me do so now.


You're very welcome, and you have showed me your appreciation before, so please continue. Razz

I'm proud of Kyle for his article because I understand that racism can't be fixed in a day. I don't expect people to feel guilty for their privilege. I, just like a lot of minorities, want those who benefit from an unfair system to understand the aforementioned and acknowledge that it exists and how they benefit from it. When you get to that point, then we can begin to heal. To Kyle and those others, I say THANK YOU!



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jammerbirdi



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PostPosted: 04/08/19 1:44 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I love Kyle Korver, but I got a lot of problems with this. And the whole white privilege thing.

At one point he says about solutions to white privilege, I don't have all the answers. And then he posts a few boilerplate 'woke' answers.

The problem with the concept of white privilege is that it is blindly unfocused. It is a scattershot idea that signals that the people who have it have no idea of what's on the other side of the fence, closed doors, the whole white world that is keeping people down and benefitting from racial inequality in America and the world. They suffer the effects of it all, generation through generation. We all suffer as a society but of course black people live it and eat it every moment of their lives in America. But "white privilege" is a hopelessly divisive but very clear indicator that people don't really have a read on the forces at work in perpetuating the superiority of white people in America.

So, to me, all this woke stuff isn't woke at all. It's more like still hopelessly asleep. Consider this. If you think there is a battle for the soul of America on this issue, WHERE geographically would you think are the strongholds of either side? Just the first places that pop in your head. Here's what most people would say.

Most people would think that the Eastern power corridor from DC to Boston and the the west coast would be the strongholds of progressive attitudes on race in America and out there in the rest of the country, fly-over as it were, the midwest and the south, more rural and conservative states, would be strongholds of more racist attitudes. I think that's a pretty irrefutable reality.

And I'm definitely not saying that the read on the rest of the country is far off or even off at all. America is rock solid racist and the hardening of people's attitudes on race is getting worse every single day in this country. But these coasts and what goes on there? That's the real sin in all of this. Three articles (should be non-stop articles) in the last year reveal the illegal extent to which NYC schools remain segregated. In 2019. The ravages of racial inequality that continue to define the inner city in all of our major cities in these liberal strongholds. On the other end you have the incredible widening of the actual privilege and power enjoyed by the affluent whites who live in these places. Virginia and the areas around DC. The private K-12 schools that exist everywhere there are affluent people in this country) so that the children of actual privilege (as we use to define it NEVER have to go to school or share a classroom with black children.

And, as you all should know by now, don't get me started on California.

There is SO MUCH meat on these bones that no one is bringing forth into the public space with the outrage and demands for change that need to occur. Fight THESE battles here in the strongholds where black people live along with the whites who are supposed to be on their sides but who really REALLY aren't. But let's get really real. We all know what passes for black leadership in the major cities in this country. Sell outs!

Oh. Kyle Korver says his first response to Theodocious (sp) being arrested was, what was he doing in a bar in the middle of a back-to-back? And that was the trigger for all of this white guilt? Everything I ever did when I was kid was met with a what the hell we're you doing up there? or some variation thereof from my parents. Now mrs. jammer is going down that road. Kyle Korver, a careful professional making millions, was exactly correct to have that as a first response. I would have thought the same thing of a teammate, nephew (I often do) or anyone else. It's a very human response.

And just the holding other white men accountable thing. You are NEVER. EVER. Going to change anything by scolding ANY one. Gee, Bob. I can see where you are correct on this matter. I will change my thinking here. That is not who human beings are. It's BULLSHIT. Fix the schools! Fix the bullshit that keeps black people who have achieved the ability to do so from living in white neighborhoods. These things are KILLING black America. These are the 'whys' of everything. Produce better future generations. The survival of this country depends on it! Literally. All of these efforts to purge racism from all our evil hearts is going to be lying in the dust with all the rest of the pillars of our own arrogance within a hundred years if we don't start holding ourselves accountable for the nuts and bolts failures we have allowed to become foundational elements of American life.



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Genero36



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PostPosted: 04/08/19 1:53 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Let me do say this. Kyle's almost 40 years old and Iverson was his teammate at one point. How are you just realizing this? The NBA changed the dress code because of him, talking about it looked bad for the "sponsors".

White Privilege also means having the luxury to come to these conclusions late in life.



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Last edited by Genero36 on 04/08/19 2:45 pm; edited 1 time in total
Genero36



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PostPosted: 04/08/19 1:58 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

And as far as NY...I shake my head when ppl think NYC is some liberal utopia. NYC is notoriously racist, and the NYPD will continue to be racist.

<embed><iframe width="607" height="341" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/o8yiYCHMAlM" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe></embed>

https://youtu.be/o8yiYCHMAlM

The school system thing NYers have known for years. Especially in regards to zoning and the “gifted” institutions that refuse to admit black kids. But the allocation of money and resources is even worse.

Housing in NYC is incredibly racist. Employment is incredibly racist. NYC is just freakin racist, and people keep trying to make it some sort of utopian mecca but it’s not.



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PostPosted: 04/08/19 2:02 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I think what I wish people were 'woke' about is the fact that nobody is giving up anything. Whatever advantages or privilges people have they're only trying to solidify them and have them written into stone for all their own future generations. And these are the ones who you think are on your side. That's a stone cold reading of the realities in this country right now if we can just see those realities playing out and if we are even capable of being totally honest about them.

Nobody is giving up their privilege or advantages and we are not talking about some intangible idea of privilege. White people of privilege are in a knock out cut throat competition with EACH OTHER right here in the liberal progressive 'woke' strongholds and believe me, and no matter how well they play the 'woke' card for their own benefit, that does not reflect who they truly are. Nor does it touch on how they live or impact much their own ongoing battles to keep up with or hopefully surpass each other. Segregated is who they truly are and how they live.



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Luuuc



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PostPosted: 04/10/19 8:45 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Good stuff, Kyle.
My take on this stuff is that, as a person who falls into basically every category of privilege that exists, it costs me nothing to insist that everyone else get treated the same way as I do. It does no damage to me to acknowledge that I get preferential treatment. I don't want to get treated better than anyone else, but I do. It's not my fault - I didn't design the system - but it's bullshit and everyone can see that it's bullshit. It didn't hurt me when gay people were allowed to get married, it won't hurt me when women get paid properly for the work they do, and it won't hurt me when racial minorities start getting treated like people too, so as long as I have a conscience why would I do anything to prevent those things from occurring.



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PostPosted: 04/10/19 10:42 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Luuuc wrote:
Good stuff, Kyle.
My take on this stuff is that, as a person who falls into basically every category of privilege that exists, it costs me nothing to insist that everyone else get treated the same way as I do. It does no damage to me to acknowledge that I get preferential treatment. I don't want to get treated better than anyone else, but I do. It's not my fault - I didn't design the system - but it's bullshit and everyone can see that it's bullshit. It didn't hurt me when gay people were allowed to get married, it won't hurt me when women get paid properly for the work they do, and it won't hurt me when racial minorities start getting treated like people too, so as long as I have a conscience why would I do anything to prevent those things from occurring.


Well said. More white males need to look in the mirror and do this simple form of "manning up", and stop whining...

"but I'M not racist". "but MY family didn't own slaves." "but I'M not privileged".



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