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Women’s college athletes don’t need another coddling par

 
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pilight



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
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PostPosted: 06/23/17 1:02 pm    ::: Women’s college athletes don’t need another coddling par Reply Reply with quote

They need a coach

https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/colleges/womens-college-athletes-dont-need-another-coddling-parent-they-need-a-coach/2017/06/23/4765cf40-5820-11e7-a204-ad706461fa4f_story.html

Quote:
Talk to coaches, and they will tell you they feel their players are harder to teach, and to reach, and that disciplining is beginning to feel professionally dangerous. Not even U-Conn.’s virtuoso coach Geno Auriemma is immune to this feeling, about which he delivered a soliloquy at the Final Four.

“Recruiting enthusiastic kids is harder than it’s ever been,” he said. “. . . They haven’t even figured out which foot to use as a pivot foot and they’re gonna act like they’re really good players. You see it all the time.”



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ArtBest23



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PostPosted: 06/23/17 2:20 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

As in. . . . .

"I also want a coach who will make me better but let me be free to a certain extent -- not try to control my game."
.....

perhaps???


StevenHW



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PostPosted: 06/23/17 7:07 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

As Baseball Hall of Fame manager Leo Durocher once said during his days managing in the early-1970's, "Whatever happened to 'sit down, shut up, and listen'?" Rolling Eyes



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GlennMacGrady



Joined: 03 Jan 2005
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PostPosted: 06/24/17 8:22 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

This is a good article and raises very important questions, which apply not only to WCBB players, or even to all college students, but to virtually everyone in what Jenkins calls "this current snowflakey, iGen safe-space climate."

I think one of the most important factors in this huge psychological re-framing in our society is the selfish immediacy of social media and the isolating tyranny of the underlying algorithms.

Kids today, and a huge chunk of adults too, are raised and live in narrow electronic incubators, which cabin their intellectual and emotional development and outlooks according to the self-reinforcing groupthink of the omnipresent social media algorithms they select. As a result, these snowflake lemmings cannot recognize, understand, accept, or even tolerate any other cabin without irrational fears or feeling hurt.
ClayK



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PostPosted: 06/24/17 9:02 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Just a note: Every generation, back to Juvenal's Satires on the ancient Romans, is convinced the younger generation doesn't work hard enough, doesn't respect its elders, has been corrupted by new technology and new ideas, and is taking the country/world directly down the toilet.

Leo Durocher said that in the '70s, and you can find similar quotes from coaches in the early 20th century (old-timers in the '20s complained about how the younger players just didn't know how to play and didn't take the game seriously). This is the sound track of sports and culture, and means almost nothing ... the older generation always harkens back to its parents as the model to which the younger generation can never measure up.

If there was any truth at all to this whining, we would be living in mud huts and trying to count past five.



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summertime blues



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PostPosted: 06/24/17 10:24 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I think there's a little bit of truth in what everyone is saying here...Sally, Glenn, and Clay. I respect Sally, just as I respected (and loved) Pat, but the days of the military drill instructor/coach are pretty much gone. Pat was that, but she also inspired love in the players who played for her, which is pretty evident in the way they continue to stick together and care for one another. Not all groups who came up in this way can do that.

This generation has been raised a little differently, for good or ill. Some of them are horrible, it's true. But most of them are fundamentally good kids: you just hear more about the awful ones, and as my dad always said (and I expect his dad before him too), "'Twas ever thus." Shoot, not only Juvenal's Satires say that, but there was an Egyptian papyrus of some 3000 years ago that complained that young people didn't listen to their elders etc. etc. So these kids think for themselves and want to be treated a certain way and if they aren't, they figure they can pick up and move on...is that a bad thing? Maybe, or maybe not.Depends on the kid, in the end, as it always has.



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readyAIMfire53



Joined: 20 Nov 2004
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PostPosted: 06/24/17 5:23 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
Just a note: Every generation, back to Juvenal's Satires on the ancient Romans, is convinced the younger generation doesn't work hard enough, doesn't respect its elders, has been corrupted by new technology and new ideas, and is taking the country/world directly down the toilet.

Leo Durocher said that in the '70s, and you can find similar quotes from coaches in the early 20th century (old-timers in the '20s complained about how the younger players just didn't know how to play and didn't take the game seriously). This is the sound track of sports and culture, and means almost nothing ... the older generation always harkens back to its parents as the model to which the younger generation can never measure up.

If there was any truth at all to this whining, we would be living in mud huts and trying to count past five.


Thanks for this Clay. Too many coaches (who aren't so well loved) like to blame it on the younger generation's lack of solid values. Right now it's in vogue to trash "millennials" as Coach McCallie did when players started exiting her program.



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ClayK



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PostPosted: 06/25/17 1:43 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

readyAIMfire53 wrote:
ClayK wrote:
Just a note: Every generation, back to Juvenal's Satires on the ancient Romans, is convinced the younger generation doesn't work hard enough, doesn't respect its elders, has been corrupted by new technology and new ideas, and is taking the country/world directly down the toilet.

Leo Durocher said that in the '70s, and you can find similar quotes from coaches in the early 20th century (old-timers in the '20s complained about how the younger players just didn't know how to play and didn't take the game seriously). This is the sound track of sports and culture, and means almost nothing ... the older generation always harkens back to its parents as the model to which the younger generation can never measure up.

If there was any truth at all to this whining, we would be living in mud huts and trying to count past five.


Thanks for this Clay. Too many coaches (who aren't so well loved) like to blame it on the younger generation's lack of solid values. Right now it's in vogue to trash "millennials" as Coach McCallie did when players started exiting her program.


It's an easy crutch for a coach to complain about "these kids today" to mask their own need to modify their styles to communicate better with a generation that is different, not necessarily better or worse. I've been coaching teen-age girls since the late '70s, and the bottom line is kids are kids and parents and parents -- but change is inevitable and if coaches don't make adjustments on and off the court, the game, and generation, will pass them by.



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Oldfandepot2



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PostPosted: 06/27/17 8:48 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
readyAIMfire53 wrote:
ClayK wrote:
Just a note: Every generation, back to Juvenal's Satires on the ancient Romans, is convinced the younger generation doesn't work hard enough, doesn't respect its elders, has been corrupted by new technology and new ideas, and is taking the country/world directly down the toilet.

Leo Durocher said that in the '70s, and you can find similar quotes from coaches in the early 20th century (old-timers in the '20s complained about how the younger players just didn't know how to play and didn't take the game seriously). This is the sound track of sports and culture, and means almost nothing ... the older generation always harkens back to its parents as the model to which the younger generation can never measure up.

If there was any truth at all to this whining, we would be living in mud huts and trying to count past five.


Thanks for this Clay. Too many coaches (who aren't so well loved) like to blame it on the younger generation's lack of solid values. Right now it's in vogue to trash "millennials" as Coach McCallie did when players started exiting her program.


It's an easy crutch for a coach to complain about "these kids today" to mask their own need to modify their styles to communicate better with a generation that is different, not necessarily better or worse. I've been coaching teen-age girls since the late '70s, and the bottom line is kids are kids and parents and parents -- but change is inevitable and if coaches don't make adjustments on and off the court, the game, and generation, will pass them by.

Perhaps Marshall McLuhan put it best “We look at the present through a rear-view mirror. We march backwards into the future:" The farther away we get from the past, the horse and buggy era per se, the more obscure and distorted it becomes, affecting our perception of not just the past but the present and inevitably the future as well.



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Last edited by Oldfandepot2 on 06/30/17 8:35 pm; edited 1 time in total
ClayK



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PostPosted: 06/27/17 4:24 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Love any reference to Marshall McLuhan. "Understanding Media" remains a brilliant analysis, and of course, we now know all too well what it means to live in a global village.



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