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Marquette Fan



Joined: 06 Mar 2005
Posts: 3123



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PostPosted: 04/07/21 7:33 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Howee wrote:
Marquette Fan wrote:
Jim Jabir is set to return to Siena. He coached there from 1987-90 before leaving for Marquette.


Wow. I'd almost forgotten about him....I remember him most vividly from his great seasons at Dayton, including an EE run in '15. (Didn't he have some serious health concerns?)


Here's an article about the move - he goes from Florida Atlantic to Siena:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/ncaaw/2021/04/07/jim-jabir-is-back-at-siena-as-womens-basketball-coach/43519217/

To tell you the truth, I'm not sure I realized he was coaching anywhere now. He's the coach who took Marquette to the NCAA Tournament for the first time and his assistant Terri Mitchell was the head coach there for a long time after he left to go to Providence. Yes he had a good run at Dayton one year and I do recall something coming up about health concerns at one point.


PlayBally'all



Joined: 17 Oct 2013
Posts: 260



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PostPosted: 04/07/21 9:35 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Vandy should consider Sam Purcell, AC Louisville. He has everything it takes to build a program... energy, knowledge and experience working under Jeff Walz.


PUmatty



Joined: 10 Nov 2004
Posts: 15599
Location: Chicago


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PostPosted: 04/07/21 9:38 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

PlayBally'all wrote:
Vandy should consider Sam Purcell, AC Louisville. He has everything it takes to build a program... energy, knowledge and experience working under Jeff Walz.


Purdue should have too ... Sigh ...


Marquette Fan



Joined: 06 Mar 2005
Posts: 3123



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PostPosted: 04/08/21 8:39 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Ginny Boggess who has been an assistant the last 7 years under Carolyn Kieger at Marquette and Penn State has been named the new head coach at Monmouth University.

https://monmouthhawks.com/news/2021/4/8/womens-basketball-ginny-boggess-named-head-womens-basketball-coach.aspx


Durantula



Joined: 30 Mar 2013
Posts: 4655



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PostPosted: 04/09/21 8:42 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Colgate head coach Job is open https://gocolgateraiders.com/news/2021/4/8/womens-basketball-colgate-womens-basketball-program-update.aspx


thefutureisbright



Joined: 12 Apr 2010
Posts: 2618



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PostPosted: 04/09/21 10:26 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Semeka Randall Lay has been named permanent HC at Winthrop. Was in interim role last season.

https://winthropeagles.com/news/2021/4/8/semeka-randall-lay-named-17th-head-womens-basketball-coach-in-winthrop-history.aspx


thefutureisbright



Joined: 12 Apr 2010
Posts: 2618



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PostPosted: 04/09/21 1:52 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Wisconsin adds 3 ACs ... Barnosky comes with Moseley from BU, Merritt joins from Illinois and Doty (former UConn player)

https://uwbadgers.com/news/2021/4/9/womens-basketball-moseley-completes-coaching-staff.aspx


thefutureisbright



Joined: 12 Apr 2010
Posts: 2618



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PostPosted: 04/09/21 2:00 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Radvile Autukaite promoted to Player Personnel Specialist at Va Tech. She was in GA role.

https://hokiesports.com/news/2021/4/9/womens-basketball-radvile-autukaite-promoted-to-player-personnel-specialist-for-womens-basketball-program.aspx


ucbart



Joined: 21 Nov 2004
Posts: 2038
Location: New York


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PostPosted: 04/09/21 2:06 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

PUmatty wrote:
PlayBally'all wrote:
Vandy should consider Sam Purcell, AC Louisville. He has everything it takes to build a program... energy, knowledge and experience working under Jeff Walz.


Purdue should have too ... Sigh ...


I have to wonder if men getting P5 head coaching jobs might be a thing of the past?!?


~UK~



Joined: 24 Oct 2006
Posts: 330



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PostPosted: 04/09/21 2:11 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

PlayBally'all wrote:
Vandy should consider Sam Purcell, AC Louisville. He has everything it takes to build a program... energy, knowledge and experience working under Jeff Walz.


You’d think Stephanie Norman(UL Assistant & 2021 Assistant Coach of the Year) would be considered before Purcell.


pilight



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
Posts: 62439
Location: Where the action is


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PostPosted: 04/09/21 2:21 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ucbart wrote:
PUmatty wrote:
PlayBally'all wrote:
Vandy should consider Sam Purcell, AC Louisville. He has everything it takes to build a program... energy, knowledge and experience working under Jeff Walz.


Purdue should have too ... Sigh ...


I have to wonder if men getting P5 head coaching jobs might be a thing of the past?!?


Last year there were six P5 openings. Only one (Texas) was filled by a man.



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Last edited by pilight on 04/09/21 3:21 pm; edited 1 time in total
blaase22



Joined: 28 Mar 2011
Posts: 4004
Location: Paradise


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PostPosted: 04/09/21 3:20 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ucbart wrote:
PUmatty wrote:
PlayBally'all wrote:
Vandy should consider Sam Purcell, AC Louisville. He has everything it takes to build a program... energy, knowledge and experience working under Jeff Walz.


Purdue should have too ... Sigh ...


I have to wonder if men getting P5 head coaching jobs might be a thing of the past?!?


Well they can get jobs on the mens side then.


ClayK



Joined: 11 Oct 2005
Posts: 10862



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PostPosted: 04/09/21 3:40 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

There's an interesting phenomenon in coaching girls and women.

A significant percentage of female coaches are at the Division I level. Division II, Division III and NAIA have many more male coaches, percentage-wise.

At the club and high school level, the preponderance of male coaches is also hard to miss.

It's natural that coaches of any gender would follow the money (and facilities and prestige), so given the choice between D-III and D-I, obviously D-I is the better one.

What this disparity does point to, however, is the smaller pool of female coaches on the women's side. A lot of this, of course, has to do with who takes care of the children in a family, since coaching is a very time-consuming activity at any level.

But I think another part is that women are less willing/more intelligent about the time demands of coaching and the financial rewards. Men, as my wife points out, are much more likely to get obsessed with some activity (a hobby, whatever) than women, who it seems to me generally take a much more balanced and healthy attitude to how to live the good life. (I know every high school program I have been associated with or know about struggles to find females to take positions on the staff -- even as assistants who don't necessarily have to be there all the time. Right now, I would love to have a female assist me on a JV team, but candidates are very, very hard to find.)

Whatever the reason, though, one can understand the male coaches' frustration about the D-1 jobs, as the overall pool of experienced coaches at lower levels contains more more men -- yet women get more of the D-1 jobs.

I'm not saying this is unfair, nor that women have an easier road, or that women aren't capable of being superb coaches. I will say, though, that it would be great if more women were coaching at all levels.



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undersized_post



Joined: 01 Mar 2021
Posts: 724
Location: midwest/indiana/iowa


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PostPosted: 04/09/21 3:45 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
There's an interesting phenomenon in coaching girls and women.

A significant percentage of female coaches are at the Division I level. Division II, Division III and NAIA have many more male coaches, percentage-wise.

At the club and high school level, the preponderance of male coaches is also hard to miss.

It's natural that coaches of any gender would follow the money (and facilities and prestige), so given the choice between D-III and D-I, obviously D-I is the better one.

What this disparity does point to, however, is the smaller pool of female coaches on the women's side. A lot of this, of course, has to do with who takes care of the children in a family, since coaching is a very time-consuming activity at any level.

But I think another part is that women are less willing/more intelligent about the time demands of coaching and the financial rewards. Men, as my wife points out, are much more likely to get obsessed with some activity (a hobby, whatever) than women, who it seems to me generally take a much more balanced and healthy attitude to how to live the good life. (I know every high school program I have been associated with or know about struggles to find females to take positions on the staff -- even as assistants who don't necessarily have to be there all the time. Right now, I would love to have a female assist me on a JV team, but candidates are very, very hard to find.)

Whatever the reason, though, one can understand the male coaches' frustration about the D-1 jobs, as the overall pool of experienced coaches at lower levels contains more more men -- yet women get more of the D-1 jobs.

I'm not saying this is unfair, nor that women have an easier road, or that women aren't capable of being superb coaches. I will say, though, that it would be great if more women were coaching at all levels.


Thank you for your post. I'm often wary of people generalizing personally traits based on gender, but I appreciate that you are trying to do it with nuance and integrity.

Re: the part I bolded above. Is there a trend of "male frustration"? How are you measuring this?


PlayBally'all



Joined: 17 Oct 2013
Posts: 260



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PostPosted: 04/09/21 4:43 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

~UK~ wrote:
PlayBally'all wrote:
Vandy should consider Sam Purcell, AC Louisville. He has everything it takes to build a program... energy, knowledge and experience working under Jeff Walz.


You’d think Stephanie Norman(UL Assistant & 2021 Assistant Coach of the Year) would be considered before Purcell.


She is very worthy of consideration. I have never met Stephanie Norman. I have met Sam and his energy and enthusiasm is very impressive. If I was hiring for a program that needed that tireless devotion to get my program on the right path, he would be as close to a sure thing as I can think of.

I have no doubt that many assistants out there are capable. I was just speaking from what I know personally.


Ex-Ref



Joined: 04 Oct 2009
Posts: 6507



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PostPosted: 04/09/21 5:15 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
There's an interesting phenomenon in coaching girls and women.

A significant percentage of female coaches are at the Division I level. Division II, Division III and NAIA have many more male coaches, percentage-wise.

At the club and high school level, the preponderance of male coaches is also hard to miss.

It's natural that coaches of any gender would follow the money (and facilities and prestige), so given the choice between D-III and D-I, obviously D-I is the better one.

What this disparity does point to, however, is the smaller pool of female coaches on the women's side. A lot of this, of course, has to do with who takes care of the children in a family, since coaching is a very time-consuming activity at any level.

But I think another part is that women are less willing/more intelligent about the time demands of coaching and the financial rewards. Men, as my wife points out, are much more likely to get obsessed with some activity (a hobby, whatever) than women, who it seems to me generally take a much more balanced and healthy attitude to how to live the good life. (I know every high school program I have been associated with or know about struggles to find females to take positions on the staff -- even as assistants who don't necessarily have to be there all the time. Right now, I would love to have a female assist me on a JV team, but candidates are very, very hard to find.)

Whatever the reason, though, one can understand the male coaches' frustration about the D-1 jobs, as the overall pool of experienced coaches at lower levels contains more more men -- yet women get more of the D-1 jobs.

I'm not saying this is unfair, nor that women have an easier road, or that women aren't capable of being superb coaches. I will say, though, that it would be great if more women were coaching at all levels.


Makes me wonder if the Adia Barnes pumping at halftime would help or hurt getting more women into coaching.

Will it be "see, you can do both" or "wow, that's what I've got to coach AND have a family?"



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thefutureisbright



Joined: 12 Apr 2010
Posts: 2618



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PostPosted: 04/09/21 6:03 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Charleston Southern Open

https://csusports.com/news/2021/4/9/womens-basketball-womens-basketball-coach-fred-applins-contract-not-being-renewed.aspx


ClayK



Joined: 11 Oct 2005
Posts: 10862



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PostPosted: 04/10/21 9:42 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I know and have known a fair number of male coaches who had or could have had college ambitions, but they all feel the same frustration women do in almost every other field. The prime example right now is Mark Campbell, the highly regarded Oregon assistant, who couldn't even get an interview for the Washington job.

The fact that women deal with this and have dealt with it forever (almost literally) is cold comfort to the individual males.



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osubeavers



Joined: 07 Jan 2017
Posts: 151
Location: West Hills, Portland, OR


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PostPosted: 04/10/21 12:54 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
There's an interesting phenomenon in coaching girls and women.

A significant percentage of female coaches are at the Division I level. Division II, Division III and NAIA have many more male coaches, percentage-wise.

At the club and high school level, the preponderance of male coaches is also hard to miss.

It's natural that coaches of any gender would follow the money (and facilities and prestige), so given the choice between D-III and D-I, obviously D-I is the better one.

What this disparity does point to, however, is the smaller pool of female coaches on the women's side. A lot of this, of course, has to do with who takes care of the children in a family, since coaching is a very time-consuming activity at any level.

But I think another part is that women are less willing/more intelligent about the time demands of coaching and the financial rewards. Men, as my wife points out, are much more likely to get obsessed with some activity (a hobby, whatever) than women, who it seems to me generally take a much more balanced and healthy attitude to how to live the good life. (I know every high school program I have been associated with or know about struggles to find females to take positions on the staff -- even as assistants who don't necessarily have to be there all the time. Right now, I would love to have a female assist me on a JV team, but candidates are very, very hard to find.)

Whatever the reason, though, one can understand the male coaches' frustration about the D-1 jobs, as the overall pool of experienced coaches at lower levels contains more more men -- yet women get more of the D-1 jobs.

I'm not saying this is unfair, nor that women have an easier road, or that women aren't capable of being superb coaches. I will say, though, that it would be great if more women were coaching at all levels.


And while this may (hopefully) be changing, I think it’s fair to say a lot of girls are still encouraged to take up basketball by fathers and brothers so are more accustomed to being mentored/coached by males than boys are to women mentors/coaches. For better or for worse. Sabrina I is an example. Encouraged by her father and brother and coached by male head coaches without exception all the way up through WNBA.



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Last edited by osubeavers on 04/10/21 1:01 pm; edited 1 time in total
osubeavers



Joined: 07 Jan 2017
Posts: 151
Location: West Hills, Portland, OR


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PostPosted: 04/10/21 12:59 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
I know and have known a fair number of male coaches who had or could have had college ambitions, but they all feel the same frustration women do in almost every other field. The prime example right now is Mark Campbell, the highly regarded Oregon assistant, who couldn't even get an interview for the Washington job.

The fact that women deal with this and have dealt with it forever (almost literally) is cold comfort to the individual males.


From what I’ve heard he was interviewed twice and was seriously considered. He’s from the Seattle area, has DEEP west coast recruiting connections and is well regarded as a strategist. I’m hearing that influential program donors put the kibosh on his consideration exclusively due to his gender.



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pilight



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
Posts: 62439
Location: Where the action is


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PostPosted: 04/10/21 1:22 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Jennie Baranczyk to Oklahoma

https://www.espn.com/womens-college-basketball/story/_/id/31230553



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Last edited by pilight on 04/10/21 1:45 pm; edited 1 time in total
undersized_post



Joined: 01 Mar 2021
Posts: 724
Location: midwest/indiana/iowa


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PostPosted: 04/10/21 1:38 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

pilight wrote:
Jennie Baranczyk to Oklahoma


Wow! I hadn't heard this yet. She has done a great job at Drake, and whenever Iowa has a losing streak of a few games and the fans start to grumble about Bluder (not me!), Jennie B was often floated as a possible candidate. I wonder how/if this will affect recruiting in the state of Iowa, and if any of Jennie B's current commits will follow her to OK. This years Iowa High School Miss Basketball, for example, had committed to Drake.


PickledGinger



Joined: 04 Oct 2013
Posts: 901



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PostPosted: 04/10/21 5:29 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Power 5 Coaching Demographics:

ACC - 3 WM, 2 BM, 7 WF, 3 BF
Big 12 - 6 WM, 4 WF
Big Ten - 2 WM, 10 WF, 2 BF
Pac 12 - 3 WM, 7 WF, 2 BF
SEC - 3 WM, 4 WF, 7 BF

Overall - 32 White Females, 17 White Males, 14 Black Females, 2 Black Males

11 Men have been hired for a HC position since 2011, one of whom was hired in the last 3 years: Kevin McGuff & Wes Moore in 2013, Kelly Graves & Jeff Mittie 2014, Brandon Schneider in 2015, Kenny Brooks in 2016, Cam Newbauer, Mike Neighbors & Mark Trahk in 2017; Lance White in 2018 and Vic Schaefer in 2020. Brooks is the only black man in that group.

8 Male coaches have 10+ years at their current school: Jim Littell (10 seasons), Scott Rueck (11), Jeff Walz (14), Joe McKeown (14), Quentin Hillsman (15), Gary Blair (18 ), Mike Carey (20), & Bill Fennelly (26). Hillsman is the only black man in that group.

31 women have gotten HC positions since 2011, 14 of whom have been hired in the last 3 years. 3 of those 14 replaced a man.

11 of those coaches were Black women, with 7 hired in the last 3 years: Joni Taylor in 2015, Adia Barnes in 2016, Yolette McPhee-McGuin & Tina Thompson in 2018, Charmin Smith in 2019; Kyra Elzy, Niele Ivey, Kara Lawson & Nikki McCray-Penson in 2020; and now Johnnie Harris & Marisa Moseley in 2021.

3 Black women have 10+ years at their current school: Nikki Fargas (10 seasons), Dawn Staley (13) & C. Vivian Stringer (26).

20 white female coaches have been hired since 2011, 7 in the last 3 years: Kim Barnes-Arico in 2012, Kristy Curry in 2013, Teri Moren & Raegan Pebley in 2014; Lynne Roberts in 2015; JR Payne & Amy Williams in 2016, Nancy Fahey in 2017; Joanna Bernabei-McNamee, Amanda Butler, Kamie Ethridge, Carolyn Kieger & Lindsay Whalen in 2018; Courtney Banghart, Nell Fortner, & Kellie Harper in 2019; Krista Gerlich in 2020, and now Jennie Baranczyk, Tina Langley and Shea Ralph in 2021.

12 white female coaches have 10+ years at their current school: Jen Hoover (10), Cori Close (10), Robin Pingeton (11), Suzy Merchant (13), Katie Meier (16), Sharon Versyp (15), Brenda Frese (19), Lisa Bluder (21), Kim Mulkey (21), Sue Semrau (23), Charli Turner Thorne (25), & Tara Vanderveer (36).



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Last edited by PickledGinger on 04/13/21 11:48 am; edited 3 times in total
Hoopsmom



Joined: 05 Apr 2017
Posts: 366



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PostPosted: 04/10/21 8:52 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Now, add in the demographics on the men’s side. How many women are getting head-coaching or even assistant coaching jobs on upper level men’s teams? Male coaches may get frustrated on the women’s side, but that’s nothing compared to women wanting to work on the men’s side. And guess which side pays more money to head and assistant coaches? Hint - it’s not the women’s teams....


undersized_post



Joined: 01 Mar 2021
Posts: 724
Location: midwest/indiana/iowa


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PostPosted: 04/11/21 1:08 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Hoopsmom wrote:
Now, add in the demographics on the men’s side. How many women are getting head-coaching or even assistant coaching jobs on upper level men’s teams? Male coaches may get frustrated on the women’s side, but that’s nothing compared to women wanting to work on the men’s side. And guess which side pays more money to head and assistant coaches? Hint - it’s not the women’s teams....


+1


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