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Hayes Dismissed from Tennessee
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Howee



Joined: 27 Nov 2009
Posts: 11237
Location: Oklahoma (in my heart), whilst on my way to Oregon!


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PostPosted: 09/05/18 11:35 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

pilight wrote:
Youth Coach wrote:
ClayK wrote:
So here's a question: What if a player smokes marijuana in a state where it's legal and then is tested in a state where it's not? How is that different than having a beer?

OK, you can say it's in whatever form the players sign, but why is marijuana worth being kicked off a team and alcohol not? Do Colorado and California schools have marijuana testing?

Marijuana apparently can be detected up to six months after smoking, so if a player transfers from a state where marijuana is legal and is not prohibited from enjoying it to a state where it is illegal and on the athlete form, does she get a drug-testing pass for six months (or however long it takes)?

Of course, to me banning marijuana is like banning alcohol -- either you ban both or neither.


Wouldn't it be simpler to not smoke pot in the first place, regardless of where you live or happen to attend school?


Addiction isn't that simple


Who mentioned addiction?? Shocked



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Youth Coach



Joined: 23 Mar 2008
Posts: 4388



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PostPosted: 09/06/18 5:57 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

pilight wrote:
Youth Coach wrote:
ClayK wrote:
So here's a question: What if a player smokes marijuana in a state where it's legal and then is tested in a state where it's not? How is that different than having a beer?

OK, you can say it's in whatever form the players sign, but why is marijuana worth being kicked off a team and alcohol not? Do Colorado and California schools have marijuana testing?

Marijuana apparently can be detected up to six months after smoking, so if a player transfers from a state where marijuana is legal and is not prohibited from enjoying it to a state where it is illegal and on the athlete form, does she get a drug-testing pass for six months (or however long it takes)?

Of course, to me banning marijuana is like banning alcohol -- either you ban both or neither.


Wouldn't it be simpler to not smoke pot in the first place, regardless of where you live or happen to attend school?


Addiction isn't that simple


Of course not. But if you don't do it in the first place, I'd imagine its hard to get addicted to it.
ClayK



Joined: 11 Oct 2005
Posts: 9319



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PostPosted: 09/06/18 9:49 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Of course it would be simpler not to drink or smoke marijuana ... but almost all cultures are intertwined with intoxicants of one kind or another, and it's part of everyone's experience.

Some do not participate, but the vast majority do, and certainly the vast majority of teenagers have tasted more than a drop of alcohol. The punishment for "street drugs" do not seem to me to fit the crime, as alcohol is a much more prevalent drug, and by most accounts, much more dangerous (and addictive) than marijuana.

But regardless, if a young athlete legally eats a marijuana brownie in California, and then fails a drug test in Georgia, should she be punished?



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willtalk



Joined: 13 Apr 2012
Posts: 535
Location: NorCal


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PostPosted: 09/06/18 11:25 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
Of course it would be simpler not to drink or smoke marijuana ... but almost all cultures are intertwined with intoxicants of one kind or another, and it's part of everyone's experience.

Some do not participate, but the vast majority do, and certainly the vast majority of teenagers have tasted more than a drop of alcohol. The punishment for "street drugs" do not seem to me to fit the crime, as alcohol is a much more prevalent drug, and by most accounts, much more dangerous (and addictive) than marijuana.

But regardless, if a young athlete legally eats a marijuana brownie in California, and then fails a drug test in Georgia, should she be punished?
So that would explain the price of those five dollars a piece brownies I saw you selling during the last WCJ. lol.


ClayK



Joined: 11 Oct 2005
Posts: 9319



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PostPosted: 09/06/18 12:01 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

willtalk wrote:
ClayK wrote:
Of course it would be simpler not to drink or smoke marijuana ... but almost all cultures are intertwined with intoxicants of one kind or another, and it's part of everyone's experience.

Some do not participate, but the vast majority do, and certainly the vast majority of teenagers have tasted more than a drop of alcohol. The punishment for "street drugs" do not seem to me to fit the crime, as alcohol is a much more prevalent drug, and by most accounts, much more dangerous (and addictive) than marijuana.

But regardless, if a young athlete legally eats a marijuana brownie in California, and then fails a drug test in Georgia, should she be punished?
So that would explain the price of those five dollars a piece brownies I saw you selling during the last WCJ. lol.


Hey, fans who bought them were mellow throughout the game, bought a lot of food and went home smiling ...



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Ex-Ref



Joined: 04 Oct 2009
Posts: 4972



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PostPosted: 09/06/18 8:06 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
Of course it would be simpler not to drink or smoke marijuana ... but almost all cultures are intertwined with intoxicants of one kind or another, and it's part of everyone's experience.

Some do not participate, but the vast majority do, and certainly the vast majority of teenagers have tasted more than a drop of alcohol. The punishment for "street drugs" do not seem to me to fit the crime, as alcohol is a much more prevalent drug, and by most accounts, much more dangerous (and addictive) than marijuana.

But regardless, if a young athlete legally eats a marijuana brownie in California, and then fails a drug test in Georgia, should she be punished?


Yes. The same as if I ate one in California and my employer has a policy that says that it's grounds for termination to have THC in my system.



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awhom111



Joined: 19 Nov 2014
Posts: 2115



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PostPosted: 09/06/18 8:38 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

To be clear, it's still against the rules in nearly all sports, even in countries where it's legal or decriminalized. This could change in the future, especially with more rsearch, but we're not there yet. If you go play overseas professionally and test positive, you will likely get a suspension for a few months.
Youth Coach



Joined: 23 Mar 2008
Posts: 4388



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PostPosted: 09/06/18 9:12 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
Of course it would be simpler not to drink or smoke marijuana ... but almost all cultures are intertwined with intoxicants of one kind or another, and it's part of everyone's experience.

Some do not participate, but the vast majority do, and certainly the vast majority of teenagers have tasted more than a drop of alcohol. The punishment for "street drugs" do not seem to me to fit the crime, as alcohol is a much more prevalent drug, and by most accounts, much more dangerous (and addictive) than marijuana.

But regardless, if a young athlete legally eats a marijuana brownie in California, and then fails a drug test in Georgia, should she be punished?


Yes. The person damn well knows that they aren't supposed to be using drugs because of the drug testing going on.
GlennMacGrady



Joined: 03 Jan 2005
Posts: 5102
Location: Heisenberg


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PostPosted: 09/06/18 11:18 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

So, all of a sudden, based on absolutely no evidence other than maybe a deleted tweet, Hayes is being discussed as a drug user, a repeat drug user, and maybe an addict.

Shameful speculation.
purduefanatic



Joined: 10 Aug 2011
Posts: 2344
Location: Indiana


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PostPosted: 09/07/18 9:44 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

GlennMacGrady wrote:
So, all of a sudden, based on absolutely no evidence other than maybe a deleted tweet, Hayes is being discussed as a drug user, a repeat drug user, and maybe an addict.

Shameful speculation.


I didn't see any of that with the exception of her possibly being a user. A larger conversation developed regarding drug/pot use, especially as it pertains to players in states where it is legal. Taking all those larger scale comments and attaching them to Hayes is something I have only seen in your post. I couldn't seem to locate a post that mentions her as an addict.


WNBA 09



Joined: 26 Jun 2009
Posts: 7589
Location: Dallas , Texas


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PostPosted: 09/07/18 11:32 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

GlennMacGrady wrote:
So, all of a sudden, based on absolutely no evidence other than maybe a deleted tweet, Hayes is being discussed as a drug user, a repeat drug user, and maybe an addict.

Shameful speculation.


+1



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elsie



Joined: 08 Apr 2016
Posts: 108



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PostPosted: 10/11/18 4:56 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I know of no state that allows teenagers to smoke/use weed.....it can be legal for adults...


ArtBest23



Joined: 02 Jul 2013
Posts: 12914



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PostPosted: 10/11/18 12:12 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ClayK wrote:
So here's a question: What if a player smokes marijuana in a state where it's legal and then is tested in a state where it's not? How is that different than having a beer?


I'm certainly not defending the current state of affairs, but the legal reality is that it's not "legal" anywhere in the United States. It's illegal under Federal law regardless of what states might be doing on their own.

Yes, it's silly, but that is the law, and that renders it completely different from alcohol.

I also thought pot was still a "banned substance" under most athletic federation rules regardless of its legality or illegality. There are plenty of things that are legal but banned. I think marijuana is on the NCAA's banned list regardless of location.


FrozenLVFan



Joined: 08 Jul 2014
Posts: 1071



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PostPosted: 10/11/18 6:24 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

AFAIK or can google, she hasn't committed or enrolled at another school, although her younger sister Aislynn just committed to MTSU.


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