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Are You the Product of a Private or Public School Education?
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Did you attend primarily private or public schools during your K-12 education?
Public School
78%
 78%  [ 25 ]
Private School
3%
 3%  [ 1 ]
Tuition Free Private School
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Attended Both Private and Public Schools
18%
 18%  [ 6 ]
Total Votes : 32

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jammerbirdi



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
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PostPosted: 03/12/18 5:59 pm    ::: Are You the Product of a Private or Public School Education? Reply Reply with quote

So it's a pretty self explanatory question. Please feel free to add whatever details or input you might know and want to share. Things like cost, curriculum, what community were you and your classmates from primarily, etc. In the event that you attended a private school at little or no cost because you were the member of a church or for some other reason, probably rare or unusual, I've added that response just in case even though it's probably not going to come up.


PUmatty



Joined: 10 Nov 2004
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PostPosted: 03/12/18 6:56 pm    ::: Re: Are You the Product of a Private or Public School Educat Reply Reply with quote

Four degrees from public schools - two from Purdue and two from Michigan.


justintyme



Joined: 08 Jul 2012
Posts: 7082
Location: Northfield, MN


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PostPosted: 03/12/18 7:27 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Public K-12 and undergrad (with 2 years at local community college). Private for my doctorate.



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Queenie



Joined: 18 Nov 2004
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PostPosted: 03/12/18 9:34 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

New York City public schools, CUNY college.

Admittedly, I lived in a very good school district for K-8 and selected a good high school for 9-12. (New York high schools are... weird.)



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pilight



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PostPosted: 03/12/18 9:46 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Public schools through HS, then a private university



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tfan



Joined: 31 May 2010
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PostPosted: 03/12/18 10:34 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Public K-12. All of K-12 in the suburbs and most of it in a sparsely populated suburb, aka "bedroom community". Went to multiple colleges and all were public or "state".




Last edited by tfan on 03/12/18 10:58 pm; edited 2 times in total
jammerbirdi



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
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PostPosted: 03/12/18 10:52 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I'm sorry. I knew I'd fuck this up. I should have put K-12 in the header.


Queenie



Joined: 18 Nov 2004
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Location: Queens


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PostPosted: 03/12/18 11:08 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

jammerbirdi wrote:
I'm sorry. I knew I'd fuck this up. I should have put K-12 in the header.


Well, it's in the poll, so I figured that was the main thrust of your question, but it seemed a natural addition to the data.



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scullyfu



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PostPosted: 03/13/18 7:12 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

k-12: a combo of private (parochial) & public. public K-3, 10-University. private: 4-9 and I never got the tee-shirt for surviving those damned nuns!



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Ex-Ref



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PostPosted: 03/13/18 7:24 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

pilight wrote:
Public schools through HS, then a private university


Ditto.



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PUmatty



Joined: 10 Nov 2004
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PostPosted: 03/13/18 8:16 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

jammerbirdi wrote:
I'm sorry. I knew I'd fuck this up. I should have put K-12 in the header.


I misread.

K-12 was public. Where I come from there aren't really private schools.


jammerbirdi



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
Posts: 19628



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PostPosted: 03/13/18 9:41 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

scullyfu wrote:
k-12: a combo of private (parochial) & public. public K-3, 10-University. private: 4-9 and I never got the tee-shirt for surviving those damned nuns!


Parochial. There's the word I was pawing for yesterday.


Howee



Joined: 27 Nov 2009
Posts: 11239
Location: Oklahoma (in my heart), whilst on my way to Oregon!


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PostPosted: 03/13/18 9:49 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

K to 8 were Lutheran parochial schools for me, then Public High School 9 to 12. Public Community College for freshman and sophomore College. Then finished bachelor's degree at Lutheran University. Following that, I taught in Lutheran Schoolsfor the first 10 years of my career. Then finished my career in teaching in public schools. So, pretty evenly split for me between the ages of 5 and 55.



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jammerbirdi



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PostPosted: 03/13/18 10:02 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Thank you for all the responses and details. I'm really trying to focus in on who (well, not so much actually identifying anyone) might have attended non-parochial private schools vs. those who attended public schools. And only K-12.

So I should have done this poll like this.

For your K-12 education did you attend...

a) Public or parochial schools or a combination of both.

b) Private schools.

So I'm betting some of the 'both' choice to my question above refers to a combination of public and parochial and not a combination of public and non-parochial private schools?

And I'm wondering about that 1 person who indicated a straight up private school education. Was that person referring to his or her parochial school education or did Glenn respond to the poll. Wink


sambista



Joined: 25 Sep 2004
Posts: 16472
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PostPosted: 03/13/18 10:20 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

public schools in chicago, but it was a time when school mattered and students mattered and teachers mattered and teachers cared. which is not to say teachers don’t care now; teachers don’t have the support or resources to teach and care like back in the day. up to eighth grade, my teachers and my mother were all close friends. they played bridge together on the weekends. my teachers were an extension of my home upbringing, and they had license to discipline me as they saw fit. my mother didn’t need a report card because she knew in painful detail everything i was doing and everything i was learning on a daily basis. she knew my strengths and weaknesses as a learner and thinker, and she knew how i was growing and coping in the social dynamic at school. high school was different because we moved to a region with racial . . . challenges . . . in which the adults who should’ve been my mentors didn’t see me accomplishing much after i graduated. they discouraged me from attending college, said it was too expensive and a waste of time, and tried to steer me toward bettering my secretarial skills (that’s when there were classes in typing, stenography, etc.). the quality of education was high, but there was no support or nurturing. (fuck you, portland, oregon!)

private college the first two years, then public university the final two and for grad school. (go, u-dub!)



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jammerbirdi



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
Posts: 19628



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PostPosted: 03/13/18 11:12 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

sambista wrote:
public schools in chicago, but it was a time when school mattered and students mattered and teachers mattered and teachers cared. which is not to say teachers don’t care now; teachers don’t have the support or resources to teach and care like back in the day. up to eighth grade, my teachers and my mother were all close friends. they played bridge together on the weekends. my teachers were an extension of my home upbringing, and they had license to discipline me as they saw fit. my mother didn’t need a report card because she knew in painful detail everything i was doing and everything i was learning on a daily basis. she knew my strengths and weaknesses as a learner and thinker, and she knew how i was growing and coping in the social dynamic at school. high school was different because we moved to a region with racial . . . challenges . . . in which the adults who should’ve been my mentors didn’t see me accomplishing much after i graduated. they discouraged me from attending college, said it was too expensive and a waste of time, and tried to steer me toward bettering my secretarial skills (that’s when there were classes in typing, stenography, etc.). the quality of education was high, but there was no support or nurturing. (fuck you, portland, oregon!)

private college the first two years, then public university the final two and for grad school. (go, u-dub!)


Here's how that little bit worked where I come from. At least for bad students, which I was. So me and three of my friends met with the guidance counselor. Bad students all. He tells us we're all going in the mill. That's it. Now get out of here. I want to go to music school. So does another of my friends. Somebody else wants to do something else. Everyone swears to God we're never going in no fucking mill. Uh-uh. The guidance counselor was adamant. Get this other bullshit out of our heads, we're all going in the mill. That was that. And the lucky of us four... you guessed it... ended up in the mill.


tfan



Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 6853



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PostPosted: 03/13/18 11:27 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Why are you looking for private school versus parochial school/public school? Aren't parochial schools a different environment than public schools - and incur an expense that a majority of parents probably can't afford?


PUmatty



Joined: 10 Nov 2004
Posts: 14444
Location: Chicago


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PostPosted: 03/13/18 11:32 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

tfan wrote:
Why are you looking for private school versus parochial school/public school? Aren't parochial schools a different environment than public schools - and incur an expense that a majority of parents probably can't afford?


Parochial schools are private schools.


jammerbirdi



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
Posts: 19628



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PostPosted: 03/13/18 11:57 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

PUmatty wrote:
tfan wrote:
Why are you looking for private school versus parochial school/public school? Aren't parochial schools a different environment than public schools - and incur an expense that a majority of parents probably can't afford?


Parochial schools are private schools.


Yeah this a pretty messy poll come to think of it. So I attended a technically private parochial school in the first and second grade. Mrs. jammer attended the same school through the eight grade as did all of her seven living siblings. If there was a cost, it would have been very very little. I know that because that school only went to the eighth grade and so to continue on to the catholic high school in our area was around $400 a year and very few went for that option and most everyone from the catholic grade school went on to the public high school. So when I think of private schools, or when I’m referring to them, I’m not referring to relatively low cost schools like those that existed in my area, in my day.

So all the attendees of our parochial private grade school were poor working class kids and that’s why I tried to make and maintain a distinction between parochial (a term i swear I haven’t heard in thirty years) or religious schools and the kind of private schools that affluent children attend. Maybe there are specific terms for the kind of private schools I’m referring to that I’m not aware of. At the heart of what I’m doing here is trying to find out how much this group knows about these other private schools. And I’m leaving descriptive adjectives out because I don’t want to influence the kinds of responses we get. Anyway.

It would be telling though if people’s responses here were, hey, our concept of a private school is a parochial school, period.


justintyme



Joined: 08 Jul 2012
Posts: 7082
Location: Northfield, MN


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PostPosted: 03/13/18 12:08 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

jammerbirdi wrote:
PUmatty wrote:
tfan wrote:
Why are you looking for private school versus parochial school/public school? Aren't parochial schools a different environment than public schools - and incur an expense that a majority of parents probably can't afford?


Parochial schools are private schools.


Yeah this a pretty messy poll come to think of it. So I attended a technically private parochial school in the first and second grade. Mrs. jammer attended the same school through the eight grade as did all of her seven living siblings. If there was a cost, it would have been very very little. I know that because that school only went to the eighth grade and so to continue attending thr catholic high school in our area was around $400 a year and very few people went for that option and most everyone from the catholic grade school went on to the public high school. So when I think of private schools, or when I’m referring to them, I’m not referring to relatively low cost schools like those that existed in my area, in my day.

So all the attendees of our parochial private grade school were poor working class kids and that’s why I tried to make and maintain a distinction between parochial (a term i swear I haven’t heard in thirty years) or religious schools and the kind of private schools that affluent children attend. Maybe there are specific terms for the kind of private schools I’m referring to that I’m not aware of. At the heart of what I’m doing here is trying to find out how much this group knows about these other private schools. And I’m leaving descriptive adjectives out because I don’t want to influence the kinds of responses we get. Anyway.

By private schools you seem to be thinking mainly of what we commonly refer to as "prep schools". Highly selective private schools with high tuitions and a focus on being "elite". Less than 1% of students go to one of these.



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Admiral_Needa



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PostPosted: 03/13/18 12:09 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Well... since it looks like I am The 1 Person who went to Private School K-12 (and beyond! Shocked), I'll try to elaborate as much as I can remember from the annual meetings and reading the previous year's annual report. Idea


K-8, went to an elite private school with a phenomenal reputation for not only being the best, but also being near impossible to get accepted to. In fact, it was just written up in the SFGate a few months ago under the heading:


Quote:
You know you're a true Marin resident if...

#57 - Have tried in vain getting your kids into Marin Country Day School. Cool

All Marin residents eat wheels of Cowgirl Creamery cheese before pedaling mountain bikes to work at the holistic doctor's office. After a day spent remotely prescribing yoga and refusing to vaccinate children, they recline in pinot-filled hot tubs and overpay nannies for picking up all of the Madisons from the nearby Waldorf Schools.

Many of us carry roughly this perception of our neighbors to the north. Marinites do little to defuse the stereotypes (and the perceived aloofness) when they point out their high life expectancy, median income and quality of life.


https://www.sfgate.com/local/article/marin-you-know-you-grew-up-in-marin-if-9196332.php#photo-4410358


Tuition at Marin Country Day School is $35,000 per year. The number of students per grade is ~60. Every year, about 2/3 of the class matriculates to 2 of the best High Schools, not only in California, but in the country: SF University High School and The Branson School. They consistently rank at about #50 and #30 the best private high schools in the USA.

From those 2 High Schools, over 1/3 of the ~100 students matriculate to the Ivy League every year, with another 1/3 matriculating to places like Stanford, MIT, Amherst, CIT, etc.

I got accepted to both, but went to SF University High School primarily because I didn't want to go to both grade school and high school in Marin, all the time while living in Marin. Wanted a new experience.. Razz



Tuition for SF University High School is $50,000 per year. The number of students per grade is ~100. The Median GPA is 3.60, SATs: ~1500, APs: >95% scored 3 or above and >75% scored 4 or above.

Unfortunately, because there are so few students, some AP courses are only taught based on demand. For example, they still don't offer an AP Biology, and recently, AP Spanish has been replaced by AP Chinese and AP Computer Science. When I was there, they had AP Spanish and AP Japanese instead of Chinese, and still no AP Biology(!). I got all 5's except for Biology, in which I was lucky to get a 4 considering all I had was an Intro to Biology course I took in my 1st year.. I had enough AP credits to essentially place out of my entire freshman year and then some at Cornell, except for Biology. A 4 only gets you placed out of 1 semester. But I ended up taking both semesters to get the easy A Twisted Evil


Here are some matriculation numbers from the annual report: Arrow

    Harvard University 16
    Princeton University 10
    Yale University 14
    Stanford University 11
    Cornell University 6
    Amherst College 7
    Brown University 8 (Boooo! Laughing)



Interesting side-note: It costs about the same to go to High School as it does to go to Cornell University: ~50k (unless they give you a full scholarship, that is Mr. Green)



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jammerbirdi



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
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PostPosted: 03/13/18 12:13 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

justintyme wrote:
jammerbirdi wrote:
PUmatty wrote:
tfan wrote:
Why are you looking for private school versus parochial school/public school? Aren't parochial schools a different environment than public schools - and incur an expense that a majority of parents probably can't afford?


Parochial schools are private schools.


Yeah this a pretty messy poll come to think of it. So I attended a technically private parochial school in the first and second grade. Mrs. jammer attended the same school through the eight grade as did all of her seven living siblings. If there was a cost, it would have been very very little. I know that because that school only went to the eighth grade and so to continue attending thr catholic high school in our area was around $400 a year and very few people went for that option and most everyone from the catholic grade school went on to the public high school. So when I think of private schools, or when I’m referring to them, I’m not referring to relatively low cost schools like those that existed in my area, in my day.

So all the attendees of our parochial private grade school were poor working class kids and that’s why I tried to make and maintain a distinction between parochial (a term i swear I haven’t heard in thirty years) or religious schools and the kind of private schools that affluent children attend. Maybe there are specific terms for the kind of private schools I’m referring to that I’m not aware of. At the heart of what I’m doing here is trying to find out how much this group knows about these other private schools. And I’m leaving descriptive adjectives out because I don’t want to influence the kinds of responses we get. Anyway.

By private schools you seem to be thinking mainly of what we commonly refer to as "prep schools". Highly selective private schools with high tuitions and a focus on being "elite". Less than 1% of students go to one of these.


Grade schools can be prep school?


jammerbirdi



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
Posts: 19628



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PostPosted: 03/13/18 12:16 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Admiral_Needa wrote:
Well... since it looks like I am The 1 Person who went to Private School K-12 (and beyond! Shocked), I'll try to elaborate as much as I can remember from the annual meetings and reading the previous year's annual report. Idea


K-8, went to an elite private school with a phenomenal reputation for not only being the best, but also being near impossible to get accepted to. In fact, it was just written up in the SFGate a few months ago under the heading:


Quote:
You know you're a true Marin resident if...

#57 - Have tried in vain getting your kids into Marin Country Day School. Cool

All Marin residents eat wheels of Cowgirl Creamery cheese before pedaling mountain bikes to work at the holistic doctor's office. After a day spent remotely prescribing yoga and refusing to vaccinate children, they recline in pinot-filled hot tubs and overpay nannies for picking up all of the Madisons from the nearby Waldorf Schools.

Many of us carry roughly this perception of our neighbors to the north. Marinites do little to defuse the stereotypes (and the perceived aloofness) when they point out their high life expectancy, median income and quality of life.


https://www.sfgate.com/local/article/marin-you-know-you-grew-up-in-marin-if-9196332.php#photo-4410358


Tuition at Marin Country Day School is $35,000 per year. The number of students per grade is ~60. Every year, about 2/3 of the class matriculates to 2 of the best High Schools, not only in California, but in the country: SF University High School and The Branson School. They consistently rank at about #50 and #30 the best private high schools in the USA.

From those 2 High Schools, over 1/3 of the ~100 students matriculate to the Ivy League every year, with another 1/3 matriculating to places like Stanford, MIT, Amherst, CIT, etc.

I got accepted to both, but went to SF University High School primarily because I didn't want to go to both grade school and high school in Marin, all the time while living in Marin. Wanted a new experience.. Razz



Tuition for SF University High School is $50,000 per year. The number of students per grade is ~100. The Median GPA is 3.60, SATs: ~1500, APs: >95% scored 3 or above and >75% scored 4 or above.

Unfortunately, because there are so few students, some AP courses are only taught based on demand. For example, they still don't offer an AP Biology, and recently, AP Spanish has been replaced by AP Chinese and AP Computer Science. When I was there, they had AP Spanish and AP Japanese instead of Chinese, and still no AP Biology(!). I got all 5's except for Biology, in which I was lucky to get a 4 considering all I had was an Intro to Biology course I took in my 1st year.. I had enough AP credits to essentially place out of my entire freshman year and then some at Cornell, except for Biology. A 4 only gets you placed out of 1 semester. But I ended up taking both semesters to get the easy A Twisted Evil


Here are some matriculation numbers from the annual report: Arrow

    Harvard University 16
    Princeton University 10
    Yale University 14
    Stanford University 11
    Cornell University 6
    Amherst College 7
    Brown University 8 (Boooo! Laughing)



Interesting side-note: It costs about the same to go to High School as it does to go to Cornell University: ~50k (unless they give you a full scholarship, that is Mr. Green)


Ding ding ding ding. We have a winner, folks. Thank you, Admiral, for responding with some really great detail. Fantastic.


tfan



Joined: 31 May 2010
Posts: 6853



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PostPosted: 03/13/18 1:26 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

PUmatty wrote:
tfan wrote:
Why are you looking for private school versus parochial school/public school? Aren't parochial schools a different environment than public schools - and incur an expense that a majority of parents probably can't afford?


Parochial schools are private schools.


Well, I would have added that comment after this earlier post:

Quote:
For your K-12 education did you attend...

a) Public or parochial schools or a combination of both.

b) Private schools.


jammerbirdi



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
Posts: 19628



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PostPosted: 03/13/18 7:03 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

tfan wrote:
PUmatty wrote:
tfan wrote:
Why are you looking for private school versus parochial school/public school? Aren't parochial schools a different environment than public schools - and incur an expense that a majority of parents probably can't afford?


Parochial schools are private schools.


Well, I would have added that comment after this earlier post:

Quote:
For your K-12 education did you attend...

a) Public or parochial schools or a combination of both.

b) Private schools.


Well, I would have thought that parochial being included in choice a) would have indicated that I wasn't looking for it as a possible response for b) but I can see that, and I'm not surprised, it is fuzzy and tricky to try to filter out for cost/class as I was trying to do. And I'm aware that there are, for instance, expensive and elite and highly desirable Catholic K-12 schools that are attended by non-Catholics. The largest private school in the Washington D.C. area is the Charles Smith Jewish Day School with tuitions that look like this.

Grades 2017-2018 Tuition
Gurim Junior Kindergarten $20,850
Lower School (Kindergarten-Grade 5) $26,030
Upper School (Grades 6-11) $33,380
Grade 12 (first semester) $17,070

Obviously I presented this all wrong in trying to weed out based on my own experiences at what a parochial school is versus the kind of private schools I'm really interested in talking about.

I'm not at all interested in discussing what is or what isn't a private school. That's a Rebkell's rabbit hole discussion that has absolutely nothing to do with why I started this thread. I don't have any global initiative here either I just wanted to make an exploration in this group on Rebkell's into this world that I believe is completely unknown to most Americans, but maybe not completely unknown to many here judging on the advanced degrees folks here have achieved.

I also suspected that the kind of schools I'm talking about and would like to initiate some discussion on ... that maybe this group mostly had little or no first hand knowledge of and, depending on where you are in this country, some of the discussion might be eye-opening to you all here. That's why I did a poll to see if any here were actually products of this type of academic upbringing or if, like me, most here had gone to public schools K-12. And personally, I'm always looking to learn from the people here and to have my own perspectives sharpened by this group. Painful as that might sometimes be. Wink

But whatever struggles I might have been having in getting to an illuminating thread discussion focused on the kinds of areas I'm most interested in exploring, the Admiral blew the roof off all that with his contribution. That's the sun opening up the sky after weeks of clouds and rain. That's the kind of first hand perspective I was fishing for on reality as it exists in these places, down to the dollar amount.

Two things. I guess my perspective on a parochial school education which is taken from growing up in a rust belt environment where so many working class kids attended Catholic schools should be pretty much disregarded as a it applies to this thread. But then again, if you went to a freaking Lutheran school K-8 for $1500 a year, out in, wherever the hell Howee's at, I'm not really thinking of that as having practical experience in the world that the Admiral's post describes. You see what I'm saying? Hopefully the Admiral's not the only one nodding his head right now.

At any rate, it shouldn't hang anybody up here, if y'all are that educated n'nat.

So Justin, you said that less than 1% of kids go to these elite K-12 schools? That's interesting. Two thoughts there. I mean, if it's close to 1%, that's still a lot of people. And I'm wondering how that percentage goes up around places like NYC, LA, DC, Chicago, SF, Boston, etc., where the money and the power already is.


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