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The Best Rap Lyricist of All-Time?
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And You Say...?
Antonio "Big Daddy Kane" Hardy
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Tariq "Black Thought" Trotter
11%
 11%  [ 1 ]
Marshall "Eminem" Mathers III
22%
 22%  [ 2 ]
Dennis "Ghostface Killah" Coles
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Lawrence "KRS-One" Parker
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Nasir "Nas" Jones
11%
 11%  [ 1 ]
Christopher "Notorious BIG" Wallace
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
William "Rakim" Griffin, Jr.
33%
 33%  [ 3 ]
Reginald "Redman" Nobles
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Tupac Shakur
22%
 22%  [ 2 ]
Total Votes : 9

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Luuuc



Joined: 10 Feb 2005
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PostPosted: 03/09/18 8:11 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

I know it's not cool these days to praise Dre, and with good reason, but I think it's fair to say that he was at the forefront of rap expanding from the east coast, and also overseas. He was also front & centre of the whole g-funk movement, which was a major new genre of rap (and one I personally still love).
Rap was expanding in all kinds of ways back then. Run-DMC & Beastie Boys both definitely helped to mainstream it before Dre did, and then not long afterwards MC Hammer & Vanilla Ice truly mainstreamed it by making it go pop. In between that, Dre did help it go more white though, which meant more money. I had some friends who got into it because of NWA (and subsequently lost interest not long afterwards when the next cool rebellious thing came along)



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Genero36



Joined: 24 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: 03/09/18 10:28 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Luuuc wrote:
I know it's not cool these days to praise Dre, and with good reason, but I think it's fair to say that he was at the forefront of rap expanding from the east coast, and also overseas. He was also front & centre of the whole g-funk movement, which was a major new genre of rap (and one I personally still love).
Rap was expanding in all kinds of ways back then. Run-DMC & Beastie Boys both definitely helped to mainstream it before Dre did, and then not long afterwards MC Hammer & Vanilla Ice truly mainstreamed it by making it go pop. In between that, Dre did help it go more white though, which meant more money. I had some friends who got into it because of NWA (and subsequently lost interest not long afterwards when the next cool rebellious thing came along)


All true but don't forget that Run DMC preceded NWA in being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

And then there's this legendary classic that reached the top 10 in 10 different countries including Australia and is considered one of the 20 best songs (this covers all genres) of the entire decade of the 1980's.

<embed><iframe width="854" height="480" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4B_UYYPb-Gk" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe></embed>

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4B_UYYPb-Gk



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justintyme



Joined: 08 Jul 2012
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PostPosted: 04/18/18 1:45 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Luuuc wrote:


Where's Kendrick btw? His body of work is already top 5 of all time IMO.

The Pulitzer Prize board seems to agree with you.

Kendrick Lamar just won for Damn. He is the first non-classical or jazz winner of the prize.

Sorry, rock fans. Hip-hop is the only genre that matters right now.


Very well chosen, imo.



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Luuuc



Joined: 10 Feb 2005
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PostPosted: 04/18/18 2:13 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

justintyme wrote:
Luuuc wrote:


Where's Kendrick btw? His body of work is already top 5 of all time IMO.

The Pulitzer Prize board seems to agree with you.

Kendrick Lamar just won for Damn. He is the first non-classical or jazz winner of the prize.

Sorry, rock fans. Hip-hop is the only genre that matters right now.


Very well chosen, imo.


He's amazing, and it's great that everyone is starting to realise it.
To Pimp a Butterfly is probably more Pulitzer-worthy than DAMN. but either way this is thoroughly deserved.



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tfan



Joined: 31 May 2010
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PostPosted: 04/18/18 4:34 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

GlennMacGrady wrote:
I enjoy these music threads. They are a welcome diversion. As to rap, I'm possibly the least qualified person in the multiverse to vote on rappers. Whenever I've heard rap music on the radio over the last 30 years, I've . . . uh, to be honest . . . switched it off. I particularly cringe at the vulgar lyrics.

In fact, I deny rap is music. If you can't hum it and dance to it, it ain't music.



There are instruments playing, which to me qualifies it as music, but I disagree with people referring to it as a "song". That is, the ones where somebody is just talking, versus when they add a female singer with a high-pitched hook.

Can't remember which, but one of my parents once commented when hearing a rapper doing his thing "Oh, another guy who got lucky". And I relate to that sentiment - I can't tell the difference in quality between a guy who makes millions rapping, and the homeless/street guy I heard rapping by a hotel late one night, or the high school kid I heard going home from school with his friends, or the guy on a dating show whose date asks him to rap after he says he can.


justintyme



Joined: 08 Jul 2012
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PostPosted: 04/18/18 11:24 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

tfan wrote:
Can't remember which, but one of my parents once commented when hearing a rapper doing his thing "Oh, another guy who got lucky". And I relate to that sentiment - I can't tell the difference in quality between a guy who makes millions rapping, and the homeless/street guy I heard rapping by a hotel late one night, or the high school kid I heard going home from school with his friends, or the guy on a dating show whose date asks him to rap after he says he can.

There is always an element of luck involved in the music industry. That homeless man might be more talented than some huge star. But the woman you heard singing in the church choir might actually be more talented than some huge star as well.

As for distinguishing good versus bad, you do it the same way you distinguish between Frost, Dickinson, and Keats, and something in a creating card or something written by a lovesick high schooler to the object of his or her affection. Or the way you distinguish between a literary classic and some dime store novel or some shitty fan fiction.



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Genero36



Joined: 24 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: 04/18/18 12:10 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Congratulations to Kendrick. I'm not fond (AT ALL) of this generations of rappers and I DETEST trap music.

However, he is still definitely a GREAT ARTIST not just rapper. Him and J. Cole are the only rappers from the current generation I will acknowledge.

...and maybe Chance.



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pilight



Joined: 23 Sep 2004
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PostPosted: 04/18/18 12:19 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

tfan wrote:
I can't tell the difference in quality between a guy who makes millions rapping, and the homeless/street guy I heard rapping by a hotel late one night, or the high school kid I heard going home from school with his friends, or the guy on a dating show whose date asks him to rap after he says he can.


There are people who can't tell the difference between Hamlet and The Revenger's Tragedy. That doesn't mean there is no difference.



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tfan



Joined: 31 May 2010
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PostPosted: 04/18/18 5:11 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Quote:
As for distinguishing good versus bad, you do it the same way you distinguish between Frost, Dickinson, and Keats, and something in a creating card or something written by a lovesick high schooler to the object of his or her affection. Or the way you distinguish between a literary classic and some dime store novel or some shitty fan fiction.



Quote:
There are people who can't tell the difference between Hamlet and The Revenger's Tragedy. That doesn't mean there is no difference.


I was referring to the delivery, not the words. I assume that the guys on the Big Bang Theory couldn't have rap careers even if they said words that people liked. In singing, you have male and female stars, but in rap it is almost all men (also almost all black men, but rap appears to have (at or at least had) much more appeal to African-Americans). Which leads me to believe that the delivery and persona is more important, or as important, or very important, versus the words.


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