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UNC and the NCAA

 
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CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 08/03/16 12:43 pm    ::: UNC and the NCAA Reply Reply with quote

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North Carolina�s response to the NCAA can be summed up in four words: �None of your business.�

North Carolina is on the verge of beating the NCAA at its own game. The response argues that the NCAA has no jurisdiction and has violated its own rules long before the university ever gets around to actually responding to any of the allegations � which it does with almost casual dismissiveness.


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/sports/college/acc/unc/article93352282.html#storylink=cpy




Last edited by CamrnCrz1974 on 10/27/16 2:13 pm; edited 1 time in total
CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 08/03/16 12:46 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

October 2014, on the basis of the Wainstein Report, Provost James W. Dean issued a letter to Jan Boxill of intent to discharge her as a member of UNC's faculty due to "profoundly flawed and unethical acts."

Reasons Dean cited:




But according to UNC, by August 2016, those "profoundly flawed and unethical acts" don't "undermine or threaten the integrity of the NCAA Collegiate Model" and amount to naught but Level III violations.



Fired for "level III violations?"
Wonder when Boxer is going to complain to the NCAA and threaten litigation against UNC...


CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 08/08/16 1:24 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

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Two years ago, UNC-Chapel Hill and UNC system officials talked about the breakthrough that helped them get to the bottom of a scheme of bogus classes that had lasted 18 years.

They had just released a 131-page investigative report by a former top U.S. Justice Department official that made the strongest connection to date between the fake classes and athletes eligibility. What made it happen, UNC Chancellor Carol Folt and UNC system President Tom Ross said, was getting the cooperation of the two people behind the classes.

Now, with UNC facing sanctions from the NCAA, the university wants the information provided by Julius Nyangoro and Deborah Crowder excluded from an infractions hearing.

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/education/unc-scandal/article94256562.html#storylink=cpy


CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 08/08/16 1:25 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

UNC athletes were 38% of "irregular" AFAM course enrollments, but only 4% of student body.


CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 08/10/16 11:23 am    ::: Reply Reply with quote

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UNCs phony-course scandal is one symptom of a deeply compromised system. For nearly two decades, the university maintained a crip African studies curriculum whose apparent purpose was to enhance the grade point averages of academically challenged varsity athletes. To charge, as has the NCAA, that bogus courses evaded institutional control is comic understatement, as is its weasel-word characterization as anomalous.

No UNC administrator since Bill Friday has exercised institutional control over the sprawling and autonomous UNC athletic complex. Fridays successors have instead paid pricey lawyers versed in the defense of monkey business. They have devised the dodgy response that gross irregularity is outside the NCAAs jurisdiction. But if bogus courses designed to assist underachieving athletes is not NCAA business, what would be? Free whiskey for the ladies field hockey teams?


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article94419977.html#storylink=cpy


CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 10/27/16 2:15 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

NCAA rejects UNC’s arguments about classes
http://digital.olivesoftware.com/Olive/ODN/NewsandObserver/shared/ShowArticle.aspx?doc=NAO%2F2016%2F10%2F26&entity=Ar00101&sk=4259C9D4

Here are UNC’s arguments against the NCAA taking up the academic fraud scandal, and how the NCAA’s enforcement staff responded:

A Does the NCAA have jurisdiction?

UNC: The NCAA has no jurisdiction over academic matters such as the content and oversight of courses.

NCAA: The case isn’t about content or management of courses. It’s about “how the unmonitored athletics department used anomalous courses in a manner different than the general student body in violation of NCAA rules.”

A Were the bogus classes broadly available?

UNC: The classes had non-athletes enrolled, along with athletes.

NCAA: Athletes made up nearly half of the enrollments, when they account for 3 percent of the student body. “The preferential and near unfettered access the AFRI/AFAM department gave athletics to the anomalous courses provided student-athletes with advantages that others simply did not have.”

A What NCAA standards did UNC violate?

UNC: The NCAA accusations of UNC’s failure to monitor and lack of institutional control failed to cite any underlying bylaw for misconduct – such as unethical conduct or impermissible benefits – involving the classes.

NCAA: The failure of academic and athletic officials to put a stop to the fake classes and to the access athletes had to them justifies those violations.

A Does the NCAA get a second chance at the scandal?

UNC: The NCAA’s enforcement staff had the opportunity to fully investigate the classes in August 2011, when UNC first notified it during the course of an investigation into improper financial benefits from agents and improper academic help from a tutor.

NCAA: The previous case involving the football team was unrelated to the fake classes, and the full scope of the academic scandal wasn’t known until three years later with the Wainstein investigation. The NCAA also noted that seven investigations prior to Wainstein’s report failed to get to the bottom of the scandal.

A Is it too late?

UNC: By the time the NCAA either re-opened or began a new investigation into the classes, the four-year statute of limitations had expired.

NCAA: The four-year limit can be waived when there is a “blatant disregard” of NCAA bylaws.

A Is Wainstein’s investigation off-limits?

UNC: The NCAA can’t consider evidence obtained by Wainstein from the two architects of the fake classes because he did not interview them in accordance with NCAA protocols.

NCAA: The Committee on Infractions gives more weight to emails and statistical information than witness statements or observations made by Wainstein and his team. The NCAA also said UNC didn’t dispute the Wainstein report and made serious reforms after its release.


CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 10/27/16 2:18 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

More from "NCAA rejects UNC’s arguments about classes"

Quote:
“It is now clear that the institution did not provide the (NCAA) enforcement staff with the entire body of pertinent information at that time, and the NCAA relied to its detriment on the thoroughness of the institution’s production,” the NCAA’s enforcement staff wrote.


Quote:
“The new information provided, for the first time, a complete picture of the athletics department’s preferential access to anomalous AFRI/ AFAM courses and, in some cases, how it used those courses to retain NCAA academic eligibility for student-athletes,” the NCAA’s enforcement staff wrote. “This access provided student-athletes with advantages that other students simply did not have.”


Quote:
[Wainstein's]report found 18 years of fake classes – most of them created by Deborah Crowder, a longtime office manager in the Department of African and Afro-American Studies. More than 3,100 students took at least one of the classes, with athletes making up roughly half of that group despite representing less than 4 percent of the student body.

Football and men’s basketball players were the two top beneficiaries of the classes by sport. The classes had no instruction and only required a paper to be submitted to obtain a high grade. They began as independent studies, but Crowder in 1999 began disguising them as lecture classes to get around a limit on how many independent studies a student could take.


CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 12/22/16 7:06 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

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A new list of NCAA allegations against UNC-Chapel Hill brings men’s basketball and football back into the picture, expands the time frame of violations and deepens the potential penalties for a scheme of bogus classes that benefited athletes.

The third version of the NCAA’s charges was released Thursday by UNC.


Quote:
This set of allegations is tougher than the first two, adding a violation of unethical conduct and providing extra benefits against the two architects of the bogus class scheme, Deborah Crowder and Julius Nyang’oro. It says UNC and its athletics department “leveraged the relationship with Crowder and Nyang’oro to obtain special arrangements for student-athletes in violation of extra-benefit legislation.”


Quote:
“Many at-risk student-athletes, particularly in the sports of football and men’s basketball, used these courses for purposes of ensuring their continuing NCAA academic eligibility,” the notice said.

The NCAA said the improper conduct occurred from fall 2002 to the end of summer 2011, a time frame that includes two UNC men’s basketball championships. The 2005 championship involved athletes who had taken many of the fake classes.


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/sports/college/acc/unc/article122420449.html#storylink=cpy


CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 12/22/16 7:07 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

Dan Kane, per Twitter:

Quote:
Breaking: UNC also says the NCAA Committee on Infractions rejected UNC's due process claims that NCAA couldn't take up fake class scandal.


https://twitter.com/dankanenando/status/811983446641872896


CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 12/22/16 7:10 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

ESPN: UNC again faces NCAA extra-benefits charge in academic case

Quote:
The NCAA has issued yet another amended notice of allegations stemming from the academic scandal at the University of North Carolina, and the new charge could lead to serious consequences for the men's basketball team.

The NCAA's new allegations include an extra-benefit charge involving men's basketball and cover a period from the 2002-03 season through the 2010-11 season. The Tar Heels won national championships in 2005 and 2009. If the NCAA, through its committee on infractions, concludes that some of the players on that team received extra benefits, they could be deemed ineligible, which could lead to serious charges, including potentially vacating those titles.


http://www.espn.com/college-sports/story/_/id/18333496/north-carolina-tar-heels-again-face-ncaa-extra-benefits-charge-academic-case


CamrnCrz1974



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PostPosted: 03/10/17 12:49 pm    ::: Reply Reply with quote

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In an affidavit, Deborah Crowder -- a retired administrator in the formerly named African and Afro-American Studies (AFAM) department -- said she didn't create courses to provide special assistance to athletes. She said both athletes and non-athletes "were treated equal" and had access to the courses through academic counselors.


Quote:
"The courses in question were generally available to students," the letter states. "The courses were academically rigorous and did not violate any official university policies. And all students were treated the same with respect to all material aspects of the courses."


Quote:
Crowder cooperated with a 2014 investigation by former U.S. Justice Department official Kenneth Wainstein, who looked into AFAM irregularities that included independent study-style courses misidentified as lecture courses that didn't meet and required a research paper or two. Wainstein's report estimated more than 3,100 students were affected between 1993 and 2011, with athletes across numerous sports accounting for roughly half the enrollments. The report focused blame largely on Crowder and ex-chairman Julius Nyang'oro, while noting Crowder graded papers despite being an office administrator and not a faculty member.


UNC faces a deadline next week to respond to the 3rd Notice of Allegations.

http://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/story/_/id/18867669/former-north-carolina-administrator-deborah-crowder-denies-academic-fraud-claims


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